masking experiments

More paint­ing exper­i­ments with mask­ing flu­id (to see how mask­ing flu­id is used, watch this video), con­tin­u­ing from my last attempt with raw can­vas, which worked in the end but proved to be a pret­ty long and kind of frus­trat­ing process. 

So I tried using the mask­ing flu­id on primed can­vas. I bought a can­vas pad (like a pad of paper, except it’s a pad of 9x12” — it says on the cov­er — real primed can­vas!) and I was quite hap­py how it turned out :D So hap­py that I even gave them titles.

 

Sym­bi­ot­ic

 

Upstream

 

Mask­ing flu­id does its job beau­ti­ful­ly on primed can­vas, it peels right off. (It feels almost like peel­ing dried white glue off the fin­gers, very sat­is­fy­ing.) But then I did some Googling and real­ized that mask­ing flu­id is basi­cal­ly latex par­ti­cles float­ing in liq­uid ammo­nia :S That explains the pun­gent smell. And it would­n’t be good to use with a group, so I tried look­ing for an alter­na­tive and came across this white glue batik method, which works kind of like mask­ing flu­id on fab­ric. So I also tried mask­ing some of the shapes with white glue.

Two things I learned about mask­ing with white glue: 

1. White glue takes a lot longer than mask­ing flu­id to dry (mask­ing flu­id takes about 15min; white glue, more like sev­er­al hours).

2. It does­n’t peel off the can­vas very eas­i­ly if the glue is applied too thin­ly, so try­ing to short­en dry­ing time by apply­ing a thin­ner lay­er of glue does­n’t quite work.

BUT! White glue is a lot cheap­er. And if I have all day at home I would total­ly use it. But not with a group. So, more exper­i­ments ahead! :D

Have a great Mon­day, everyone!

 

p.s. I did­n’t explain the process of mak­ing those two paint­ings, because I think that would be kind of bor­ing to read. But if you have any ques­tion feel free to drop me a note! :D