last day…

Today is our last day in Hong Kong. Time flew by so quickly. It seems like only yesterday that we were busy packing to leave for the trip. Today we’re busy packing again to return home.

In the past week we tried to squeeze in as many sights as we could. We went to the Hong Kong museum of history on free Wednesday. There were tons to see, and even on regular days the admission is only $10 HKD. I was most fascinated by the exhibit about the boat-dwellers.

This teahouse look strangely familiar

After the museum my sister took us to a 13-story mall, where we scrambled down some ramp along with Peppermint Patty and the gang.

The next day we went to the Kowloon Walled City Park. It was a place we really wanted to visited because we heard a lot about the Walled City from a friend who used to work with the people living there before it was demolished and converted into a park. Zumi took some pictures of the parts that were preserved, like the bureaucrat’s office…

… and remnants of the south gate.

The Walled City looks nothing like the way it was, when people used to live there. There was a bronze sculpture in the park capturing the state of the area moments before it was demolished.

I’ve actually never seen the Walled City in person while growing up in Hong Kong. I would never be able to fully comprehend what it was like to have only 3 running taps and 3 elevators serving thousands of people living in small quarters. It feels a bit ironic to walk through artfully designed courtyards with mini waterfalls and artificial ponds while thinking about the struggles of the people who once walked these grounds.  Thought I do believe that the park is definitely a positive transformation. I wondered what the former residents think about the park and whether their lives were a bit easier now.

Yesterday we visited my uncle’s fish farm, which could only be reached by boat. My lack of swimming abilities and poor sense of balance made the boat ride and even time on the fish farm a bit nerve-wrecking (as you can see, there’s no railing or rope or anything to hang on to while walking on those planks! : S), but we had good fun nonetheless.

Underneath the planks were nets inside which the fish live. It feels a bit surreal, just because it was quiet and not a high-rise in view — it’s hard to believe such a place exists within the city!

After the fish farm we went to the local fish market, where people where selling seafood and such from their boats off the pier.

From one of these boats I bought some succulent dried cuttlefish floss :D

This lady was selling some starfish. Not for eating, I hope. For aquariums, perhaps? While walking around the pier I overheard that someone bought hundreds of dollars worth of live fish and other sea life to set them free.

And so that was pretty much the end of our adventure. We’re now getting ready for another 15-hour plane ride home, where real life awaits. While feeling sad, I’m reminded of a Calvin & Hobbes comic strip Mike once gave me, in which Calvin laments the end of fall and playing in the leaves and Hobbes said, if special things last forever then they wouldn’t be special anymore.

I wish I could find that comic strip online and post it here because it’s so fitting. The 20°C Hong Kong autumn is indeed ending for us and we’re about to return to that sub-zero Canadian winter. But if I were to stay living in Hong Kong I probably wouldn’t appreciate it as much as I do now. Life is always more fun as a tourist. Real life in Hong Kong is definitely not peachy keen all the time, and snow can be fun some of the time. If only the TTC can be half as efficient as the MTR. Seriously, I’ve taken the MTR dozens of times while here and haven’t experienced one single delay, where I run into at least one delay per day while taking the TTC. Sheesh.

Anyway. I digress. Will write again when I’m on Canadian soil! Take care!

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