the most sincere socks

photo-2016-12-05-11-09-36-am-1

Tis the countdown to Christmas, I thought I’d share a most sincere idea for the most practical gift. Who doesn’t need an extra pair of socks? Great alternative to chocolate covered marshmallow Santas when you need to get an under $5 secret Santa gift. 

The pom pom on top is actually a fun festive hair tie! I’ll show you how I made that as well.

I got a pack of 5 reused yarn socks from MUJI, they’re soft and lovely (not to mention that it’s such a nice relaxing experiencing when browsing around at the MUJI store) and cost around $20 CAD, which rounds out to about $4 a pair. 

This is super simple and involves things that you probably have stashed away at home if you’re a crafter:

  • A new pair of socks in cupcake colour
  • An elastic band
  • Light card stock or scrapbooking paper (I bought a sheet of gold metallic paper from Michaels for 99 cents)
  • Cupcake wrapper template (there are tons of printable templates out there, I can’t seem to find the one I used >_<, but this one seems just as great)
  • Scissors
  • Scotch tape
  • Mug of tea (essential!)

Here we have our pair of socks, and the elastic band.

photo-2016-12-05-10-05-19-am

With the socks stacked together, fold them in half lengthwise. The heels will stick out but that’s ok.

photo-2016-12-05-10-06-03-am

Starting from the cuff end, roll up the socks.

photo-2016-12-05-10-06-40-am

Secure the sock roll with elastic band.

photo-2016-12-05-10-07-11-am

Have a sip of tea. Transfer cupcake wrapper pattern onto the back of card stock / scrapbooking paper, and cut out the pattern.

photo-2016-12-05-10-13-58-am

Wrap the wrapper around the sock roll, and secure with a piece of tape.

photo-2016-12-05-10-15-33-am

Repeat with all the pairs of socks you’ve got and set them aside.

photo-2016-12-05-10-23-12-am

Now we make the pom pom hair tie :D 

I used: 

  • A fork
  • Small amount of red worsted weight yarn 
  • Small amount of sparkly silver yarn (for a festive touch)
  • Scissors
  • Hair elastics
  • Fabric glue (great to have, but not essential)

Using a fork to make small pom poms isn’t my original idea. There are a few tutorials out there, like this one from Eskimimi Makes.

Basically, you would wind the yarn around the prongs of the fork (as you can see I used two different yarns, and I cut off a length of the silver yarn for winding, rather than winding directly from the skein, to make things easier)…

photo-2016-12-05-10-27-02-am-1

… after you’re done winding, cut yarn. Then cut a length of red yarn about 6 inches long, and tie the yarn around the middle by threading one yarn end through the base of the 2nd and 3rd prongs of the fork, and the other yarn end between the 2nd and 3rd prongs at the tip.

Trim the pom pom but leave the tying yarn long.

photo-2016-12-05-10-35-35-am

Using the tying yarn, tie the pom pom to the hair elastic with double knot. Apply a dab of fabric glue (if you have it) to the knot to extra secure it.

photo-2016-12-05-10-37-45-am

Here we have our cupcake toppings! I also bought these adorable strawberry bells from Etsy seller MimiLolo, I attached them to cell phone charm hangers (not sure if they’re called that, but you know what I mean), thought they’d make great zipper pull or festive backpack ornaments! :D

If you know that the gift recipient won’t like hair ties or zipper pulls, a simple Tootsie Pop might make the best alternative topping.

photo-2016-12-05-10-53-11-am

I pulled the hair elastic / cell phone charm hanger through the middle of the sock rolls using a crochet hook.

photo-2016-12-05-10-54-44-am

Ta-da! The most sincere socks of them all! Linus would be proud. (see It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown)

photo-2016-12-05-11-48-23-am

I put some of them in recycled packaging from gift soaps.

photo-2016-12-05-11-12-43-am

And I made a flat-bottom gift bag with wrapping paper following this tutorial. I then folded the top down, punched two holes at the top through all layers, threaded a fancy string through and tied a bow.

photo-2016-12-05-11-33-15-am

Have a sweet week, everyone! 

photo-2016-12-05-11-08-16-am

 

 

momo

photo-2016-10-17-4-49-14-pm

Momo means peach in Japanese. Perhaps this tawashi looks more like a pumpkin than a peach, but momo is a cuter name :)

I’m going to show you how to make one with tulle, using the pattern from Pierrot (link via Ravelry, with slight modifications explained below). Tulle makes for a scrubbier tawashi than acrylic or cotton yarn, I think.

A roll of this decorative tulle from Michaels makes 2 tawashi’s! It’s 6 inches wide by 20 yards. Here’s how we transform the roll of tulle into balls of yarn :D

photo-2016-10-17-5-07-26-pm

  1. Roll of Tulle.
  2. Pop off the plastic caps on both ends of the roll, then remove the inner paper tube.
  3. Using fabric scissors, cut roll in half through all layers (it would be a bit tough to cut through but just keep nudging forward)
  4. Roll half of the roll into a ball. Repeat with the other half. 

Now we have 2 balls of tulle yarn!

For the tawashi, I also used 5mm and 3.5mm crochet hooks, tapestry needle, and a small amount of green yarn.

I followed the pdf pattern from Pierrot (it’s charted, but very easy to understand), but with the following stitch counts: 

  1. Using 5mm hook, ch 16.
  2. Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across (15 sc).
  3. Starting at row 2, work in pattern for 18 rows, it’ll be close to the end of the ball of yarn. Fasten off, don’t cut off the yarn, and there should be a long tail enough to do all the sewing described below.

To finish:

  1. Sew the two short edges together with the long tail, don’t fasten off.
  2. Thread the tail through the stitches at one edge around, cinch.
  3. Then thread the yarn tail to the other edge, and thread the tail through the stitches around. Cinch, and tie off to secure.
  4. Using green yarn and 3.5mm hook, tie yarn to the middle of the tawashi through all layers, ch 15, sl st to where the yarn was attached in the middle of the tawashi, fasten off, weave in ends (I hid the ends inside the tawashi).

And there we have it, quick homemade gifts one can make a handful in a couple of evenings!

Happy autumn! 

 

friendship and hospitality

photo-2016-09-23-6-31-55-pm

I was thinking of making some practical Christmas gifts for family. I thought of making wash cloths. Because everyone can use more wash cloths. And I made a couple using this excellent pattern from Hakucho. It’s a lot of fun to knit using variegated yarn!

photo-2016-09-17-9-32-12-am

And then I thought I could modify the stitch pattern a bit and make some hand-drying towels. I know that the specific gift recipients I’m thinking of are always inviting people over and hosting gatherings for family and friends. And the hexagon pattern lends itself easily to the making of a pineapple, and pineapple is a symbol of warm welcome, friendship and hospitality (read more here if you’re interested!). So the pineapple hand-drying towel pattern was created. And since it is a symbol of friendship, it must be shared ^_^

I used Bernat Handicrafter Cotton in “Lemon Swirl” and “Sage Green”. I wish I could find a brighter yellow and a lighter green, but there weren’t any other kind of worsted cotton at the Michaels I visited. But I think overall it still looks like a pineapple.

photo-2016-09-23-3-32-19-pm

This pattern uses both knitting and crochet. Crochet is only used in the top (green, hanging) part. It’s not complicated, just involves making chains, single crochet and slip stitch.

I used two 4.5 mm straight needles and a 3.5 mm crochet hook. Also used tapestry needle for sewing and a 1-inch button.

Knit — pineapple body:

First, download the free Circle Cloth pattern from Hakucho. (I know it’s a bit annoying to go back and forth between two patterns, but the knitting pattern isn’t mine so I don’t want to reproduce it here — so please bear with me >_<)

With green, CO 14.

Row 1: p all stitches.

Row 2: kfb all stitches (28 st).

Rows 3–8: Attach yellow, work pattern rows 3–8 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 9: Switch to green, work pattern row 9 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 10: k2, *k1fb, k1*, repeat from * to * across until last 3 st, k3 (40 st).

Rows 11–12: Work pattern rows 11–12 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 13–18: Switch to yellow, work pattern rows 3–8 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 19–22: Switch to green, work pattern rows 9–12 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 23–28: With yellow, work pattern rows 13–18 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 29–32: With green, work pattern rows 19–22 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Now there should be 3 sections of yellow completed.

Repeat pattern rows 3–22 in Circle Cloth pattern 3 more times. Then repeat pattern rows 3–8 once more. There should be 10 sections of yellow altogether. Fasten off yellow.

Pineapple top row 1: With green, work pattern row 9 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 2: k1, k2tog to last st, k1.

Row 3: p1, p2tog to last st, p1. (11 st.)

Row 4: k all st.

Row 5: p all st.

BO all st, don’t fasten off. Insert crochet hook in last remaining loop.

photo-2016-09-23-4-36-04-pm

Crochet — pineapple top:

The pineapple top is crocheted in loops. We’ll first make 2 loops attached to the pineapple top, then make 3 longer loops going from the pineapple top and attached together at the top creating a buttonhole tap, and end with 2 loops attached to the pineapple top, like so…

photo-2016-10-01-12-08-14-pm

Loop 1: From where we left off in the knitting part, ch 25, sc in same st at beginning of ch. When crocheting into the knit part, be sure to insert hook through both loops in the BO stitches.

photo-2016-09-25-7-23-05-pm

Loop 2: ch 25, sc in next BO st.

Loop 3: sc in next BO st, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 5 ch, ch 35, sc in next BO st at pineapple top.

Loop 4: sc in next BO st, ch 35, sc in each sc in the 6-sc row that was made in loop 3, ch 1, turn (turning ch does not count as a st), sc in first sc, ch 3, skip 3 sc, sc in next 2 sc, ch 35, sc in next BO st.

Loop 5: sc in next BO st, ch 35, sc in next 2 sc at top of loop 4, 3 sc in next ch 3 sp, sc in last sc, ch 1, turn, sc in next 6 sc, ch 35, sc in next BO st.

Loop 6: sc in next BO st, ch 25, sc in next BO st.

Loop 7: ch 25, sl st in same st at beginning of ch, fasten off. Weave in ends.

Sew button to the knit part of the pineapple top. And we’re done! :D

photo-2016-09-24-9-51-48-am

Hope you like the project and have fun if you do give it a try. Have a fabulous first week of October! :D

 

hongdae

So named because I tried working with this yarn on a project while staying in Hongdae, Seoul, and because this hipster mustard yellow seems to go well with the neighbourhood that is known for its urban arts and many indie cafes.

I ended up frogging the project that I was working on while in Hongdae. In the meanwhile, the Ginkgo pattern has been getting a lot of traffic lately and I’ve been thinking about doing a crochet-only remake for those who are not really into sewing. So I thought I’d use this yarn for a new pattern.

Photo 2016-06-24, 11 45 23 AM

As with all of my patterns, I made the garment to fit me, but it doesn’t involve much shaping at all and I think it’d be pretty easy to adjust size.

Closer up of the lace pattern :D

Photo 2016-06-24, 11 42 21 AM

I used:
Mirasol IllarisDK weight 100% cotton, 5 skeins, 580 yards (you’d need more yarn if you were making a larger size)
4.5 mm hook
Tapestry needle

Finished measurements:
Bust 30″
Length 20.5″
Length — shoulder to underarm 7″
collar width 9″

Gauge: 6 dc = approx. 1″
To adjust size, add or decrease multiples of 6 ch in foundation ch.
One could also make it wider for a cap-sleeve boxy-top look.

Pattern:

Front:

ch 63

Row 1 (RS): dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in every ch across, turn (61 dc).

Row 2–33: ch 3 (counts as 1 dc throughout), dc in every dc across, turn.

Start lace pattern: 

Row 1: ch 1 (does not count as a st), sc in first dc, *ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc, ch 2, dc in same dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, sc in next dc* repeat from * to * till end of row, turn.

Row 2: ch 5 (counts as dc and ch 2), dc in first sc, ch 2, sc in ch 2 sp, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sk next ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * till last sc of row, ch 2, dc in last sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sk next ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to *, ending with sc in 3rd ch of turning ch, turn.

Rows 4–12: Repeat rows 2–3 four more times, then row 2 once more.

Left shoulder:

Row 1: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * two more times, turn.

Row 2: ch 2, sk first ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * once more, ch 2, dc in last sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * once more, turn.

Row 4: ch 1, sc in first sc, [sc in ch 2 sp, sc in dc] twice, sc in ch 2 sp, 2 sc in sc, [sc in ch 2 sp, sc in dc] twice, sc in ch 2 sp, sc in last sc. Fasten off.

Right shoulder:

Attach yarn to the beginning of row 12 of lace pattern at the 3rd ch of turning ch. Work the same as left shoulder.

Back:

Work the same as front until shoulders. Repeat lace pattern row 3, then row 2.

Left shoulder: Work rows 3–4 of shoulder for front.

Right shoulder: Attach yarn to the beginning of row 14 of lace pattern at the 3rd ch of turning ch. Work the same as left shoulder.

Assembly:

With wrong sides together, sew shoulder seams together.

With wrong sides together, sew side seams together, starting at the base of the 2nd dc row below the start of the lace pattern, and sewing to the bottom edge of the garment.

Turn garment right side out. Work one row of sc evenly around the collar, basically working 1 sc in each dc, sc, and ch 2 sp. Then work one row of sc evenly around each of the armholes. I find that it turns out pretty even when I work 1 sc in each row-end, and 1 sc in a space between 2 rows.

Weave in all ends. And we’re finished :)

Photo 2016-06-24, 11 41 01 AM

As always if you spot any mistakes or have any questions please feel free to drop me a note, and I will correct or try my best to assist!

Happy first week of summer!

 

 

ode to nyan cat

Needed to make myself a new wallet, I thought I’d make something fun :D

Photo 2016-06-02, 8 34 40 PM

The Nyan Cat pop-tart! :D

Photo 2016-06-02, 8 30 50 PM

That’s not really a wallet, one might say. More like a cardholder, one might also say. I guess one could use it as a card holder. I made myself a tiny wallet this size when I started working at a coffee shop nearly a decade ago. There were no lockers in the backroom, so I made a wallet that would fit in my jeans pocket, so that it’s always on my person as I worked. I’ve been using the small wallet ever since. My bank cards and IDs fit snugly in it. And the few bills I have I’d just fold them up to fit them in.

In case anyone finds a crocheted case of this size useful, I’ve made a chart! :D And a few notes describing how I made it.

chart

The finished size is about 2.5″ x 3.5″.

I used worsted weight yarn in tan, pink and dark pink, a 3mm hook, and a tapestry needle.

  1. With tan, ch 13
  2. sc in every ch across (12 sc)
  3. Repeat row 2
  4. Begin following the chart adding the pink and dark pink, using stranded crochet technique*
  5. At the end of the chart, you’d have 18 rows altogether. Don’t fasten off, crochet 18 more rows with tan. Fasten off, leaving a long tail for sewing.
  6. With wrong side out, fold the piece in half crosswise, sew the sides together. Weave in ends, turn right side out.

*Tips on stranded crochet for this project:

  • The first row incorporating pink (3rd row of chart) is wrong side, as are all the rows with just pink.
  • All the rows incorporating both pink and dark pink are right side.
  • Changing colours: in the stitch before new colour, yo and draw up a loop with old colour, yo with new colour and pull through loops on hook.
  • Carry the strands of colours not in use as you crochet and wrap the strands in the stitches you make. When working on the right side, carry the strands of yarn on the back of the work. When working on the wrong side, carry the strands of yarn in the front of the work.

Do let me know if you have any questions! :)

Have a good rest of the week and weekend, everyone!

 

 

make a toasty blanket!

Photo 2015-11-22, 9 32 06 AM

I made this fun blanket for a dear friend who’s having a baby. I thought it could serve as a warm blanket for the stroller and carrides, and maybe also as a floor blanket to roll around on. It also works as a cozy lap blanket for mom! :D

With the bulky yarn and giant hook, it’s a pretty quick project. The finished size is about 26“x30”.

What I used:
Bernat Blanket, 1 ball of “sand” and 1 ball of “taupe” (I had quite a lot of taupe left, probably enough to make 2 pairs of the slippers in this post)
Light yellow yarn for butter pat (I happen to have a chenille texture yarn that I got from the dollar store once, but any yellow yarn would do)
15 mm hook (for toast)
Appropriate size hook for butter pat (depending on the yarn you’re using)
6 mm hook (for facial details)
Tapestry needle

What I did:

With “sand” colour yarn, ch 31.

Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in every ch across, turn (30 sc).

Row 2: ch 1 (does not count as sc), sc in each sc across, turn.

Repeat row 2 until piece is about 22″ from beginning.

Bread top shaping:

Row 1: ch 1, 2 sc tog, sc in each sc across until 2 sc left in row, 2 sc tog, turn.

Row 2: repeat row 1 of bread top shaping.

Row 3: ch 1, 2 sc tog, sc in next 9 sc, 2 sc tog, turn.

Row 4: ch 1, 2 sc tog twice, sc in each sc until 4 sc left in row, 2 sc tog twice, turn.

Row 5: ch 1, skip first sc, sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc tog, turn.

Row 6: ch 1, skip first sc, 3 sc tog, fasten off, weave in ends.

Attach yarn to middle of bread top shaping at row 3, repeat rows 3–6 for the other side of bread top.

Crust:

Attached “taupe” colour yarn to any stitch at the bottom edge of toast, ch 1 (does not count as sc), sc around toast evenly (1 sc in each sc at bottom edge and bread top, 1 sc in each row-end on the sides, making 2 sc in each corner, and making 3 sc tog in the middle of bread top where it dips in), sl st in first sc to finish round.

Crochet 2 more times around toast, fasten off, weave in ends.

Eyes (make 2, or more, to make a multi-eyed monster toast):

With “taupe”, 10 hdc in magic ring, sl st in first hdc to complete round, fasten off, leave a long tail for sewing.

Smile:

With “taupe” and 6 mm hook, ch 9, fasten off, leave a long tail for sewing.

Butter pat:

Crochet a rectangle about 3“x4”. Number of stitches and rows will depend on the yarn you use. When fastening off, leave a long tail for sewing.

Assembly:

Sew eyes, smile and butter pat onto toast with tapestry needle. When sewing on butter pat, I tucked in bits of the bottom edge so it looks like it’s melting.

And here’s Mr. Toast relaxing before going to his new home :)

Photo 2015-11-22, 9 30 58 AM

Stay toasty, everyone! :D

finger-knitted ear-warmer

Tomorrow is the first day of December! Thought I’d share a super cozy last minute gift to make :D

fingerknitted headband

I’ve mentioned this ear-warmer in a post before, and finally got around to taking all the pictures to make a how-to :D It works best with bulky weight yarn, to keep the fabric soft. I think super bulky would turn out too stiff. Because of the way the knitted fabric curl with finger-knitting, the ear-warmer/headband will also turn out double-thick! So it’s super warm :)

I used:

Bulky weight wool. I used the scrap yarn I have, but one ball of this will be enough to make one headband of solid colour. 2 balls if you want to make one with a contrasting colour.

No need for needles and hooks, just fingers :) but you do need a tapestry needle for sewing the headband together.

Notes:

I learned finger-knitting and joining method from Knitting Without Needles by Anne Weil. She also has a photo tutorial on how to finger-knit here. But to save everyone the trouble of going back and forth between different sites, I’m showing the basics of finger-knitting in the how-to below as well.

The bind-off method is inspired by this finger-knitted blanket video by Good Knit Kisses. The author of the video uses a different finger-knitting method than the one I’m used to, so I just took the basic idea and made up a bind-off method that works for me.

Basically, finger-knitting produces a long strip of knitting. For the headband, we’re going to make 6 strips of knitting and join them together lengthwise as we knit.

It might take longer to make the headband if you’re learning finger-knitting for the first time. But with some practice, the headband took me a couple of hours in front of the TV to finish :)

Ready? Let’s knit! :D

We first make a setup row. Take your left hand, take the yarn end and hold it between your thumb and hand, then take the yarn behind your middle finger, in front of your fourth finger, and behind your pinky.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 04 05 PM

Wrap the yarn around your pinky, take it behind your fourth finger, in front of your middle finger, and behind your index finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 05 06 PM

Wrap the yarn around your index finger, then take it behind your middle finger, in front of your fourth finger, and behind your pinky again.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 05 49 PM

Wrap the yarn around your pinky, take it behind your fourth finger, and in front of your middle finger, than hold the yarn between your index finger and middle finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 06 22 PM

Straighten out the wrapping a bit, it will look something like the picture below, with the yarn end still held between your thumb and your hand, and the working yarn tail between your index finger and middle finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 09 12 PM

Now, starting from your pinky, take the lower loop of yarn, and pull it over the upper loop of yarn and over your finger, so that you would have only one loop of yarn left on your finger. Repeat on your fourth finger and middle finger.

Then take the yarn end between your thumb and hand, and swing it to the back of your hand between your index finger and middle finger, like so. We’ve now completed the set up row.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 11 06 PM

We now begin our first row. Wrap the working yarn around your index finger, from left to right, take it behind your middle finger, in front of your fourth finger, and behind your pinky.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 11 43 PM

Wrap the working yarn around your pinky, take it behind your fourth finger, in front of your middle finger, and hold it between your index finger and middle finger. The working yarn tail will always rest between your middle finger and index finger after each row.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 12 34 PM

Starting with your pinky, pull the lower loop on your finger over the upper loop and over your finger. Repeat with your fourth finger, middle finger, and index finger. We’ve completed a row!

Repeat the steps from “we now begin our first row” to “we’ve completed a row” 39 more times. So that altogether we will have 40 rows.

Note on size: 40 rows fits me fine, since headbands are supposed to be a bit snug to stay on the head, and because of the loose gauge of finger-knitting the headband will stretch. But the length of your knitted strip may also vary according to the kind of yarn you use or the tension of your knitting. You can wrap the knitted strip around your head after 40 rows, and see if the ends will meet with a bit of stretching, and if you need to add or take out a row or two. Or if you’re making it for somebody else, make the knitted strip a couple of inches shorter than the person’s estimate head circumference. I think an average adult head is 22″ around.

As you knit, the right side of the work will be facing the back of your hand, the wrong side of the work will be facing up.

After the 40th row is complete, we now begin to bind off the strip. Wrap the working yarn around your index finger from left to right. Hold the yarn between your index finger and middle finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 24 11 PM

Pull the lower loop over the upper loop and over your index finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 24 55 PM

Place the remaining loop on your index finger onto your middle finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 27 23 PM

Take the working yarn and wrap it around your middle finger, from left to right. Pull taut (but not too tight) the working yarn by holding it between your index and middle fingers. Pull the two lower loops on your middle finger over the upper loop (working yarn loop) and over your middle finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 27 59 PM

Transfer the remaining loop on your middle finger onto your fourth finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 28 25 PM

Wrap the working yarn around your fourth finger, from left to right. Pull taut the working yarn tail by gripping it between your index and middle fingers. Pull the two lower loops on your fourth finger over the upper loop and over your fourth finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 28 45 PM

Transfer the remaining loop on your fourth finger to your pinky. Wrap the working yarn around your pinky, from left to right. Pull taut the working yarn tail by gripping it with your index and middle fingers. Pull the two lower loops on your pinky over the upper loop and your pinky.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 29 03 PM

You will have one remaining loop left on your pinky.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 29 24 PM

Without turning the knitted piece, transfer the loop on your pinky to your index finger, with the right side of the work facing you, positioned like the picture below.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 30 21 PM

We are now knitting the second strip, and joining it to the first strip as we knit. Wrap the working yarn around your fingers as usual to knit one row.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 30 54 PM

Then, position the knitted strip and your hand like the picture below. Note that the right side of the knitted piece is still facing up.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 32 00 PM

Insert your index finger from under the loop into the outermost loop of the second row from your hand — the highlighted loop in the picture below.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 32 41 PM

You will now have two loops on your index finger.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 33 06 PM

Then wrap the working yarn around your fingers as usual to knit the row. When you get to your index finger, pull the two lower loops over the upper loop.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 33 43 PM

And in every row hereafter, before wrapping the working yarn around your fingers to knit the row, insert your index finger into the outermost loop of the knitted strip — the highlighted loops in the picture below.

Photo 2015-11-28, 12 34 55 PM

When the second strip is complete, bind off as shown before, with one loop remaining.

If you’re making a solid colour headband, you can continue knitting until you have 6 knitted strips altogether. If you’d like a contrasting colour, change colour after knitting the first 2 strips, as follows.

Make a loop with new colour and place loop in the working loop, like so.

Photo 2015-11-28, 2 05 55 PM

Tie the yarn end of the new yarn to the working yarn tail of the previous colour. You might want to put a pen into the new yarn loop to stabilize it when tying. Cut off the previous colour.

Photo 2015-11-28, 2 08 16 PM

Then knit with new yarn and join it to the previously knitted strip, as shown before. Knit two strips with the new yarn. Then change to previous colour, and knit two strips.

Photo 2015-11-28, 2 35 47 PM

After binding off the 6th strip, leave a long tail for sewing, and cut off yarn. Pull the yarn end through the working loop to fasten off.

Now we sew the headband together. With wrong side facing, sew the two short ends of the headband together using a loose mattress stitch. Because of the loose gauge of finger-knitting, some stitches are going to be quite loose. Ensure that your needle is passing through two strands of yarn on each side in each stitch.

Photo 2015-11-28, 3 13 33 PM

After sewing the seam together, don’t fasten off. Pull the sewing yarn tight to cinch the seam. Turn piece right side out. Wrap the sewing yarn firmly around the middle a couple of times, with the top and bottom edges of the headband folding into the centre, like so.

Photo 2015-11-28, 3 18 00 PM

Fasten off the sewing yarn by tying it to the beginning yarn end. Weave in ends.

Now we make the small strip in the middle of the cinch. Finger-knit a piece that is 6 rows long, and bind off, leaving a long tail for sewing.

Photo 2015-11-28, 3 29 33 PM

Wrap the piece around the cinched middle of the headband, sew the ends of the small piece together, then sew through all layers of the headband a couple of times through the middle. Fasten off by tying the sewing yarn tail to the beginning yarn end of the small knitted piece in the middle.

Photo 2015-11-28, 3 32 05 PM

And we’ve done it! A double-thick, super warm, (literally) handmade ear-warmer! :D

Photo 2015-11-28, 3 39 47 PM

I hope my photos are clear. But if you have any questions, please feel free to leave a comment below and I will try my best to explain, and other visitors will benefit from your questions too, so don’t be shy :)

Wishing you a happy week!

 

ramen cardigan

DSC_0178

I wanted to make a cozy, sort of slouchy fall cardigan that one would want to relax in. I was going to name it something poetic like “lakeside” to evoke the relaxed cottage vibe, but then I posted an in-progress picture on social media and one of my friends commented that it looked like ramen. And I thought, that’s a much better better name for it! After all, I can relate to relaxing at home, watching movies on TV and eating ramen more than I can relate to relaxing at the cottage, which I’ve actually never done in my life.

This is a very easy cardigan to make. It is based on the one row lace pattern by Magda Makes. I made an infinity scarf for a friend one year using the pattern and had a lot of fun, I figure I would make an entire sweater with it :D

The cardigan is made of 5 rectangular pieces. These pieces are seamed together, then a 2x2 rib is worked along the front pieces and back of neck for collar.

It has a loose-fitting body with fitted sleeves. It’s also made with a loose gauge, so it’s pretty plushy.

DSC_0179

Measurements of my cardigan:
Bust = 40″
Sleeve circumference = 11″
Length = 21″

Size adjustments:
I made the cardigan to fit me, but since the construction and stitch pattern is so simple, it wouldn’t be too difficult to adjust size. To increase or decrease width, add or subtract multiple of 4 stitches. 4 stitches = approx. 1″

I used:
Worsted weight yarn, approx. 1000 yards (more yarn will be needed if you’re making a larger cardigan)
7 mm straight needles
6 mm circular needles, 29″

What I did:

Back

With larger needles, CO 80.

Work k2, p2 rib for 8 rows.

Work 1 row lace pattern by Magda Makes until piece is 21″, or desired length, from CO edge. Fasten off loosely.

Right and Left Front (make 2)

CO 28.

Work k2, p2 rib for 8 rows.

Work 1 row lace pattern by Magda Makes until piece is 21″, or desired length, from CO edge. Fasten off loosely.

Sleeves (make 2)

CO 40.

Work k2, p2 rib for 8 rows.

Work 1 row lace pattern by Magda Makes until piece is 17″, or desired length, from CO edge. Fasten off loosely.

Collar

With right sides together, sew shoulder seams together.

With smaller needles and right side facing, pick up an even number of stitches evenly up the front, across back the neck, and along the other front. (approx. 1 st per row-end up/down front, and 1 st in each st across back of neck works for me)

Work k2, p2 rib for 8 rows, fasten off purl-wise.

Assembly

Find mid-point of sleeve, match this point to the shoulder seam, pin sleeve to body, then sew sleeve to body with right sides together. Repeat for the other sleeve. Sew sleeve and side seams together. Weave in ends.

Throw it on and be cozy! :D

DSC_0176

Happy autumn! :D

 

water’s edge, a remake

 

2015-07-25 00.04.34

A remake of the Pastel dress, with a yarn that reminds me of the seashore — the different shades of blue in the distance, the greens of algae and seaweed washed up on the rocks.

Similar to the remake of the Ginkgo top, this sweater uses the same lace pattern as the top of the Pastel dress (which was a variation of the Ginkgo lace pattern), minus the armhole shaping and with a simpler boat neck shaping.

2015-07-25 00.08.50

 

The yarn I used was Mary Maxim Prism in Still Waters. I love this yarn. It’s affordable, super washable, the colours are amazing, has a nice drape. I wish there is a Mary Maxim closer to where I live… *sigh*

It has a very simple shape and stitch pattern, so I imagine it would look nice with a variegated yarn like Noro, or a sparkly yarn for fancier occasions :)

I used:

Light worsted weight yarn, approx. 700 yards

5 mm and 4.5 mm hooks

Tapestry needle for sewing

Sweater measures: 34″ around, 19.5″ in length

Length is easily adjustable by working more or fewer rows. Width can be adjusted by adding or subtracting stitches in the foundation ch by multiples of 6.

6 stitches = 1 3/8”

Pattern:

Stitch pattern:
Fan = [dc, 2 ch, dc, 2 ch, dc] in same space

Front: 

With 5 mm hook, ch 85.

Row 1: dc in 6th ch from hook, skip next 2 ch, dc in next ch, [skip next 2 ch, fan in next ch, skip next 2 ch, dc in next ch] to end, [dc, ch 2, dc] in last ch, turn.

Row 2: ch 3, skip first dc, fan in dc between fans, [dc in 2nd dc of next fan, fan in next dc between fans] to end, dc in 3rd ch of turning ch, turn.

Row 3: ch 5, dc in 1st dc, dc in 2nd dc of next fan, [fan in next dc between fans, dc in 2nd dc of next fan] to end, [dc, ch 2, dc] in turning ch, turn.

Repeat rows 2 & 3 until there are 34 rows altogether, ending with row 2.

Neck shaping:

Row 35: work in pattern to the 4th fan of the row, dc in 2nd dc of the 4th fan, dc in next dc between fans, turn.

Row 36: ch 5, dc in next dc, dc in the 2nd dc of next fan, work in pattern till end, turn.

Row 37–38: work in pattern. Fasten off.

Attach yarn to the other corner of row 34, repeat rows 35–38.

Back:

Repeat pattern for front until neck shaping. Work 2 more rows so that there are 36 rows altogether, ending with row 2.

Neck shaping:

Row 37–38: repeat rows 35 and 36 of front. Fasten off.

Attach yarn to the other corner of row 36, repeat rows 37–38.

Assembly:

With right sides together and wrong sides facing, sew shoulder seams together.

With right sides together and wrong sides facing, sew side seams together, starting at the top of the 11th row from the top of the sweater.

Turn sweater right side out.

Edging: with 4.5 mm hook

Neckline: attach yarn to a dc (not part of a fan) on the back of neck. ch 1, sc in same dc, [sc in 1st dc of fan, sc in next ch 2 sp, skip 2nd dc of fan, sc in next ch 2 sp, sc in 3rd dc of fan, sc in next dc] around, sl st in beginning sc of found, fasten off.

Armholes: attach yarn to any space on the armhole. We will be crocheting into the side of the rows, or what I call “row-ends”. ch 3, work 2 dc in each row-end around, sl st in top of beginning ch 3, fasten off. Repeat for the other armhole.

Bottom edge: attach yarn to any ch 2 space, ch 3, work 1 dc in every ch 2 space, every base of a fan, and every base of a dc, sl st in top of beginning ch 3, fasten off.

Weave in all ends.

And it’s done! :D

Here’s an in-between shot in which I was caught adjusting the necklace, which I thought turned out kind of cool and stylish :D

2015-07-25 00.08.06

 

Hope you enjoy the remake! Have a happy Saturday! :D