spring forward

Winter seems to be dragging on in my corner of the world, but that doesn’t stop us from getting ready for sandal weather and looking forward to blooming trees :)

Last year I tried crocheting shoes because I hate shoe shopping. I made some shoes and sandals with jute soles, I was quite happy with how the pattern turned out, but the jute sole turned out to be a bit bumpy and uncomfortable after walking in them for a while. Several friends have sent me this crocheted shoes pattern by Make & Do Crew, so I thought I’d try using flip flop soles this time.

And I think they turned out not so bad! :D

I thought I’d share how I made them here. As much as I’m sharing it with you, I’m also recording it so I can remember what to do when these wear out, because they’re really quite comfortable! If you try to make them I hope you’d like them too :) It took me just two evenings to make them and I was taking process photos and such, so it’s a fairly quick project. And apologies in advance about the poorly lit process photos! The weather has been so drab lately and the lighting in our apartment is bad :S but hopefully the what the photos are trying to show is clear! If not, drop me a note!

I used:

One pair of flip flops (I bought mine from Old Navy for about $5 CAD, in size 5)

One skein of Bernat Handicrafter Cotton (80 yrds, mine in Indigo)

3.5 mm hook, and a smaller hook (i.e. 2.5 mm) to weave in ends

Sewing needle

Sewing thread that matches the colour of yarn

2 half-inch buttons

A long sharp tool (I used an awl for bookbinding, but I know that’s not really an everyday handy tool, so I did a quick search for awl alternatives, and the results that came up were metal skewers and long crewel needles)

Masking tape or painter’s tape

Sharpie marker

Tape measure

Kitchen scissors

What I did:

First, I cut off the straps on the sandals with kitchen scissors. I left the bits of plastic in the holes where the straps were attached though, because I plan on wearing these outdoor and I don’t want holes in the soles of my shoes.

I then put painter’s across the soles and wrapped around the sides, the top piece of tape positioned just a bit above where the straps were attached at the top of the sole. On mine it’s about 1.5″ from the very top of the sole, but that would probably be different if you have a different size shoe. It doesn’t really matter, as long as the tapes on both shoes are positioned the same way. I put a couple more pieces of tape across so that the taped area is 2.5″ in length. Again you can make it longer or shorter, as long as both shoes are the same.

I then marked one side of the sole on the painter’s tape with a tape measure and marker, with a marking every quarter-inch apart, at about the midpoint of the thickness of the sole, starting at one edge of the taped area and ending at the other edge of the tape. 

I then poked holes at the markings and going through diagonally from the side to the top of the sole, coming out about quarter-inch away from the edge at the top of the sole, like so…

Repeat marking and poking holes on the other side of the sole. Remove all the tapes.

I put painter’s tape around the heel, starting and ending where the original sandal straps were attached at the bottom of the sole, and marked and poked holes in the same way I did one the sides of the sole. Remove the tapes when done.

Repeat for the other shoe. Make sure both shoes have the same number of holes!

With top of the sole facing, and a length of yarn and sewing needle, attach yarn to the first hole at the top on one side of the sole, like so…

Sew through the holes made with blanket stitch.

When you get to the last hole, reinsert the needle down from the top of the sole to the side of the sole, then tie off securely.

Don’t worry about all the loose ends, you can weave them in when you crochet the top and heel :)

Repeat the blanket stitch on the other side of the sole and the heel, then repeat on the other sole. It will look like this.

Now we’re ready to crochet! :D

Left Sandal Top:

With a blanket stitch, you would have a vertical thread and horizontal thread in each stitch. Attach yarn to the vertical thread on the top right of the sole, work 1 sc around this thread, then work 1 sc around the horizontal thread right next to it, then work 1 sc in every horizontal thread to the end of the row, and placing last sc around the last vertical thread of the row.

Second row and every row thereafter: ch 1 (does not count as a stitch), sc in each sc, turn. 

You can put your foot on the sole and see how wide you need to make the top as you go. It’s good to make it a bit snug, I imagine it will stretch a bit as you wear it. There were 26 rows in mine. End with a wrong side row. 

Attach row: sl st in top left vertical thread of the blanket stitch on the sole, then sl st together next sc on the sandal top and next horizontal thread of blanket stitch on the sole, continue with sl st in next sc and next horizontal thread till end, end with sl st in vertical thread of last blanket stitch on the sole, fasten off.

Edging: Attach yarn to the vertical thread of the blanket stitch on the top right side of the sole, ch 1, sc evenly across top edge of sandal top. I find that repeating [1 sc in each of the next 3 end of sc row, skip 1 end of row] seems to work well. Ending with sl st in vertical thread of blanket stitch on the top left side sole, fasten off.

Repeat edging on the bottom edge of the sandal top. Weave in ends.

Left Sandal Heel:

Attach yarn to first vertical thread on the right side of the sole, work 1 sc around this thread, then work 1 sc in the horizontal thread right next to it, then work 1 sc in every horizontal thread to the end of the row, and placing last sc around the last vertical thread of the row.

Row 2–3: ch 1 (does not count as a stitch), sc in each sc, turn.

Row 4 (decrease row): ch 1, skip first sc, sc in next sc and each sc till there are 2 sc left, 2 sc tog, turn.

Repeat rows 2–4 twice more. Fasten off.

Edging: Attach yarn to the first vertical thread on the right side of the sole (same stitch where the heel started). ch 1, sc evenly up the side of the heel. I find that repeating [1 sc in each of the next 3 end of row, skip 1 end of row] seems to work well.

When you reach the top of the right side of the heel piece, ch 30, sc in the 6th ch from hook, sc in every ch (strap made), then sc in each sc across the top of the heel, then sc evenly down the other side of the heel, end with sl st in last vertical thread of the last blanket stitch on the heel, fasten off. Weave in ends.

Attach button with matching thread to the top left corner of the heel piece.

Right Sandal Top:

Make as left sandal top, except start by attaching yarn to the bottom left vertical thread on the sole. 

Right Sandal Heel:

Make as left sandal heel, except when crocheting edging, work sc evenly up the right side of the heel piece, then sc in each sc across the top of the heel piece, then ch 30, sc in 6th ch from hook, sc in each ch, then work sc evenly down the left side of the heel piece.

Finishing:

Sew button on each heel piece opposite of the strap.

Ready to roll :D

These are fairly plain-looking, but they’re my first try, and I do like simple designs. But maybe one day I’ll try to incorporate fancier stitch pattern or a closed toe version! As always if you have any questions please feel free to leave a comment below :)

Hope everyone is having a good weekend!

cumulus

Or, an exercise in crochet cables!

Cumulus is a shrug/cardigan with a ring of cables around the neck/front/back. 

 

The construction is quite simple. Basically, it’s making a 25″ x 26″ rectangle, folding it in half, sewing the side seams, then attaching yarn to crochet the sleeves in the round. Sleeves measure 11″ from where it joins the arm hole to cuff.

I used 5.5 mm and 5 mm hooks, and one ball of Lion Brand Pound of Love

Below are the stitches used, you can click on the link for instructions on how to make the stitches.

fdc = foundation double crochet

bpdc = back post double crochet

fpdc = front post double crochet

bptr = back post treble crochet (made the same way as bpdc, but make a treble crochet stitch instead of a double crochet stitch)

fptr = front post treble crochet (same as above)

Note: you might want to make the front/back post stitches a bit more loosely than you would when making a typical double crochet stitch, so that the post stitches are a bit taller to match the height of the regular dc’s. 

Pattern:

(RS) With larger hook, begin with 96 fdc. (you can add to the length of the shrug by adding more fdc stitches at this point. 4 dc = 1″)

Row 1 (WS): ch 3 (counts as a dc throughout), [bpdc in next dc, dc in next dc, skip 3 dc, bptr in next 3 dc, turn, make 3 fptr in the skipped stitches, turn, dc in next dc after the 3 bptr, bpdc in next dc], dc in every dc till there are 11 stitches left, repeat from [ to ], dc in last dc, turn.

Here is a photo re-cap of how the cable was made. At the point where you’ve skipped 3 dc, bptr in next 3 dc from right to left as usual.

Now turn the piece. You’re only turning the piece temporarily because it’s easier to work from the other side to form the cable. fptr in the 3 skipped stitches from left to right. I’ve made the first of the 3 fptr in this picture.

Then turn the work back and continue on pattern.

Row 2: ch 3, [fpdc in next dc, dc in next dc, fpdc in next 6 stitches, dc in next dc, fpdc in next dc], dc in each dc till there are 11 stitches left, repeat from [ to ], dc in turning ch, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, [bpdc in next dc, dc in next dc, bpdc in next 6 stitches, dc in next dc, bpdc in next dc], dc in each dc till there are 11 stitches left, repeat from [ to ], dc in turning ch, turn. 

Row 4: repeat row 2

Repeat rows 1 to 4 until piece is 26″ from beginning, ending with Row 3. Fasten off.

Side seams:

Position piece so that the cables are horizontal. With wrong side facing out, fold piece in half (the hold is parallel to the cables). Starting from the bottom of each side, crochet the side seams together by matching the stitches on both layers and using slip stitch, crochet 22 sl st up each side.

Sleeves:

Turn piece right side out.

Attach yarn to a stitch near the side seam in the arm hole, ch 3, make 49 dc around the arm hole, turn.

Row 1: ch 3, dc in each dc around, sl st in top of turning ch, turn.

Row 2 (decrease row): ch 3, 2 dc tog, dc in each dc until the last 2 dc, 2 dc tog, sl st in top of turning ch, turn.

Row 3–4: repeat row 1.

Row 5: repeat row 2.

Repeat rows 3–5 seven more times. Work row 1 one more time. Don’t turn piece on the last row. 19 rows altogether on sleeve. 

Row 20 (RS): with smaller hook, ch 3, [fpdc in next st, dc in next st] repeat from [ to ] around, don’t turn.

Repeat row 20 twice. Fasten off. Repeat for the other sleeve.

Finishing:

Attach yarn anywhere on collar, with larger hook, work 2 sc around each dc or turning ch post around collar/front/back, sl st in first sc to complete round. Fasten off, weave in all ends.

Finished :)

Feel free to leave me a message in the comments if you have any questions! Happy crocheting!

 

pink fisherman

Made a colour block hat in bright pink this weekend :D

I usually don’t wear bright pink, it’s kind of outside my comfort zone, but it’s quite uplifting in February, where the days are short, grey, cold and snowy.

It incorporates the fisherman rib pattern that I learned from Purl Soho. The stitch makes an extra squishy fabric that’s very cozy for a hat. The hat is worked flat and then seamed. The resulting fabric is also quite stretchy, and I imagine the hat will stretch as it is being worn, so the stitch count is conservative, and it fits my head comfortably (21″ in circumference). But I’ve also included instruction for a larger size in parenthesis.

What I used:

Red Heart Soft Essentials in Peony (bulky) — one skein

Contrasting bulky weight yarn (I actually used Issac Mizrahi Lexington yarn in Irving, it’s a super bulky yarn that I untwisted, or split into 2 strands, and only used one strand at a time. It was a very time consuming, boring task, so I would suggest just using a regular bulky yarn, unless you’re in love with the Issac Mizrahi yarn like I was.)

6 mm straight needles

Tapestry needle

Toilet paper roll and scissors (for pom pom)

Pattern:

CO 56 (60) with pink.

Follow fisherman rib pattern for scarf until piece is 4″ from beginning.

Attached contrasting yarn, break off pink, and continue in pattern until piece is 6″ in length (or desired length, i.e. 7–8″ if you want a bit of a slouch)

Larger size only:

Row 1: *work in pattern for 8 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 2: work in pattern.

Row 3: *work in pattern for 7 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 4: work in pattern.

For all sizes, continue as follows:

Row 1: *work in pattern for 6 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 2: work in pattern.

Row 3: *work in pattern for 5 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 4: work in pattern.

Row 5: *work in pattern for 4 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 6: work in pattern.

Row 7: *work in pattern for 3 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 8: work in pattern.

Row 9: *work in pattern for 2 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 10: work in pattern.

Row 11: *work in pattern for 1 st, p2 tog* repeat from * to * to end.

Row 12: work in pattern.

Row 13: p2 tog to end. 

Leave a long tail for sewing a break off yarn, weave yarn tail through remaining stitches, cinch tightly and tie off. With wrong side out, use remaining yarn tail to sew up seam until pink section. Fasten off contrasting colour yarn tail. Using pink yarn, sew up the rest of the seam in pink section. Fasten off and weave in ends. 

Pom pom making

Flatten a toilet paper roll, and used the flattened roll to make the pom pom as if it is a square of cardboard. This blog post has a nice photo tutorial.

As you shape the pom pom, leave the yarn tail that you used to tie the middle of the yarn wrap long. Use the yarn tail to attach the pom pom to the top of the hat.

Have a bright and happy weekend, everyone!

 

 

sideways reimagined

I wrote the pattern for the Sideways sweater a few years back, and wanted to make a new version based on the design with solid double crochet stitches. But then I thought just rows upon rows of double crochet stitches would be too plain to look at and too boring to make, so here’s what I came up with :D

It’s a very relaxed-looking pullover, with 3/4 sleeves. Use a soft yarn with nice drape. I used Caron Simply Soft, and it worked really well.

Size:
Finished circumference at bust: 37″ 
Sleeve circumference at upper arm: 14″
Sleeve length: 11.5″
Length: 22″ 

Material:
6.5 mm and 5.5 mm crochet hooks
Caron Simply Soft yarn in Dark Country Blue, 3 skeins

Note: 
Pullover is worked from side to side, starting from one sleeve cuff and ending at the other sleeve cuff, then folded in half along shoulders, and sewn together along underarm seams and side seams. The construction is fairly simple, so it would be easy to modify sizes. Pattern will include suggestions on making larger sizes.

Pattern

Sleeve

Row 1 (RS): with larger hook, ch 36, dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in each ch to end, turn. (34 dc — beginning ch 3 counts as a dc)

To increase sleeve circumference: for each additional inch, add 4 ch to the beginning ch 36. Note that the total stitch count will be increased as well.

Row 2: ch 3 (counts as a dc throughout), dc in each dc to end, turn.

Rows 3–5: repeat row 2

Row 6: ch 3, 2 dc in next dc, dc in each dc until last two st, 2 dc in next dc, dc in top of turning ch, turn.

Rows 7–11: repeat row 2

Row 12: repeat row 6

Rows 13–18: repeat rows 7–12 once more. (40 dc at row 18) 

To increase sleeve length: for each additional inch, work row 2 twice more.

Row 19: ch 3, dc in each dc to end, ch 45, fasten off.

To increase total length: for each additional inch, add 4 ch to the ch 45.

Front/Shoulder/Back

Row 1: reattach yarn to top of beginning ch of row 19, ch 47, dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in each ch, dc in each dc across sleeve, dc in each ch in the ch 45 from row 19, turn. (130 dc)

To increase length: if you’ve added ch to the previous ch 45, add the same number of ch to the ch 47 in row 1.Note that the total stitch count will be increased as well.

Rows 2–5: work as row 2 in sleeve.

To increase circumference at bust to 39″ (41″): repeat row 2 once (twice) more.

Row 6: ch 3, dc in next 61 dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 7: ch 3, dc in each dc until ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 8: ch 3, dc in each dc until 2 dc before ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 9: ch 3, dc in each dc until ch 2 sp, [2dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2] twice, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Front

Row 1: ch 3, dc in each dc until 2 dc before ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc, turn. Leave remaining st unworked.

Row 2: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, dc in each dc till 2 dc before ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, turn.

Row 4: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 5: ch 3, dc in each dc till 2 dc before ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] three times, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, turn.

Row 6: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] three times, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 7: ch 3, dc in each dc till 2 dc before ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] four times, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, turn.

Row 8: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] four times, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 9: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] three times, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, turn.

Row 10: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] three times, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 11: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, turn.

Row 12: ch 5, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, dc in each dc to end. Take hook off loop but keep loop on hold, don’t fasten off.

Back

Row 1: with a separate ball of yarn, attach yarn to the stitch to the left of the last stitch of row 1 of front. ch 3, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Rows 2–12: repeat row 1.

Fasten off.

Front/shoulder/back

Row 1 (join row): place hook back in loop where it was left off in row 12 of front. ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 5 sp, ch 2, dc in 3rd ch of ch 5, dc in last dc made in back, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 2: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, [ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp] twice, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 4: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Row 5: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc and each dc to end, turn.

Row 6: ch 3, dc in each dc till ch 2 sp, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Rows 7–9: ch 3, dc in each dc to end. 

To increase circumference at bust to 39″ (41″): if you’ve added rows in the previous front/shoulder/back section, add the same number of rows here. 

Fasten off.

Sleeve

If you’ve made increases in the other sleeve, make sure that this sleeve has the same number of stitches and rows.

Row 1: From last stitch made, count 45 dc, join yarn at the 46th dc. ch 3, dc in next 39 st, turn.

Row 2: ch 3, 2 dc tog, dc in each dc till last 3 st, 2 dc tog, dc in top of turning ch, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, dc in each dc to end, turn.

Rows 4–7: repeat row 3.

Rows 8–19: repeat rows 2–7 two more times (34 dc). Fasten off.

Finishing

With right sides together, fold sweater along shoulders, and sew underarm and side seams together. Weave in ends.

With smaller hook, attach yarn at shoulder seam of neck opening. Work one row of sc evenly around neck opening.

With smaller hook, attach yarn at side seam of lower edge of sweater. Work one row of sc evenly around lower edge.

(2 sc in each end of row worked for me.)

 

Hope you enjoy this re-make! Drop me a note if you have any questions, or if you spot any mistakes, I’d greatly appreciate it!

Happy crafting!

 

the most sincere socks

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Tis the countdown to Christmas, I thought I’d share a most sincere idea for the most practical gift. Who doesn’t need an extra pair of socks? Great alternative to chocolate covered marshmallow Santas when you need to get an under $5 secret Santa gift. 

The pom pom on top is actually a fun festive hair tie! I’ll show you how I made that as well.

I got a pack of 5 reused yarn socks from MUJI, they’re soft and lovely (not to mention that it’s such a nice relaxing experiencing when browsing around at the MUJI store) and cost around $20 CAD, which rounds out to about $4 a pair. 

This is super simple and involves things that you probably have stashed away at home if you’re a crafter:

  • A new pair of socks in cupcake colour
  • An elastic band
  • Light card stock or scrapbooking paper (I bought a sheet of gold metallic paper from Michaels for 99 cents)
  • Cupcake wrapper template (there are tons of printable templates out there, I can’t seem to find the one I used >_<, but this one seems just as great)
  • Scissors
  • Scotch tape
  • Mug of tea (essential!)

Here we have our pair of socks, and the elastic band.

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With the socks stacked together, fold them in half lengthwise. The heels will stick out but that’s ok.

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Starting from the cuff end, roll up the socks.

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Secure the sock roll with elastic band.

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Have a sip of tea. Transfer cupcake wrapper pattern onto the back of card stock / scrapbooking paper, and cut out the pattern.

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Wrap the wrapper around the sock roll, and secure with a piece of tape.

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Repeat with all the pairs of socks you’ve got and set them aside.

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Now we make the pom pom hair tie :D 

I used: 

  • A fork
  • Small amount of red worsted weight yarn 
  • Small amount of sparkly silver yarn (for a festive touch)
  • Scissors
  • Hair elastics
  • Fabric glue (great to have, but not essential)

Using a fork to make small pom poms isn’t my original idea. There are a few tutorials out there, like this one from Eskimimi Makes.

Basically, you would wind the yarn around the prongs of the fork (as you can see I used two different yarns, and I cut off a length of the silver yarn for winding, rather than winding directly from the skein, to make things easier)…

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… after you’re done winding, cut yarn. Then cut a length of red yarn about 6 inches long, and tie the yarn around the middle by threading one yarn end through the base of the 2nd and 3rd prongs of the fork, and the other yarn end between the 2nd and 3rd prongs at the tip.

Trim the pom pom but leave the tying yarn long.

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Using the tying yarn, tie the pom pom to the hair elastic with double knot. Apply a dab of fabric glue (if you have it) to the knot to extra secure it.

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Here we have our cupcake toppings! I also bought these adorable strawberry bells from Etsy seller MimiLolo, I attached them to cell phone charm hangers (not sure if they’re called that, but you know what I mean), thought they’d make great zipper pull or festive backpack ornaments! :D

If you know that the gift recipient won’t like hair ties or zipper pulls, a simple Tootsie Pop might make the best alternative topping.

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I pulled the hair elastic / cell phone charm hanger through the middle of the sock rolls using a crochet hook.

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Ta-da! The most sincere socks of them all! Linus would be proud. (see It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown)

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I put some of them in recycled packaging from gift soaps.

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And I made a flat-bottom gift bag with wrapping paper following this tutorial. I then folded the top down, punched two holes at the top through all layers, threaded a fancy string through and tied a bow.

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Have a sweet week, everyone! 

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momo

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Momo means peach in Japanese. Perhaps this tawashi looks more like a pumpkin than a peach, but momo is a cuter name :)

I’m going to show you how to make one with tulle, using the pattern from Pierrot (link via Ravelry, with slight modifications explained below). Tulle makes for a scrubbier tawashi than acrylic or cotton yarn, I think.

A roll of this decorative tulle from Michaels makes 2 tawashi’s! It’s 6 inches wide by 20 yards. Here’s how we transform the roll of tulle into balls of yarn :D

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  1. Roll of Tulle.
  2. Pop off the plastic caps on both ends of the roll, then remove the inner paper tube.
  3. Using fabric scissors, cut roll in half through all layers (it would be a bit tough to cut through but just keep nudging forward)
  4. Roll half of the roll into a ball. Repeat with the other half. 

Now we have 2 balls of tulle yarn!

For the tawashi, I also used 5mm and 3.5mm crochet hooks, tapestry needle, and a small amount of green yarn.

I followed the pdf pattern from Pierrot (it’s charted, but very easy to understand), but with the following stitch counts: 

  1. Using 5mm hook, ch 16.
  2. Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in each ch across (15 sc).
  3. Starting at row 2, work in pattern for 18 rows, it’ll be close to the end of the ball of yarn. Fasten off, don’t cut off the yarn, and there should be a long tail enough to do all the sewing described below.

To finish:

  1. Sew the two short edges together with the long tail, don’t fasten off.
  2. Thread the tail through the stitches at one edge around, cinch.
  3. Then thread the yarn tail to the other edge, and thread the tail through the stitches around. Cinch, and tie off to secure.
  4. Using green yarn and 3.5mm hook, tie yarn to the middle of the tawashi through all layers, ch 15, sl st to where the yarn was attached in the middle of the tawashi, fasten off, weave in ends (I hid the ends inside the tawashi).

And there we have it, quick homemade gifts one can make a handful in a couple of evenings!

Happy autumn! 

 

friendship and hospitality

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I was thinking of making some practical Christmas gifts for family. I thought of making wash cloths. Because everyone can use more wash cloths. And I made a couple using this excellent pattern from Hakucho. It’s a lot of fun to knit using variegated yarn!

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And then I thought I could modify the stitch pattern a bit and make some hand-drying towels. I know that the specific gift recipients I’m thinking of are always inviting people over and hosting gatherings for family and friends. And the hexagon pattern lends itself easily to the making of a pineapple, and pineapple is a symbol of warm welcome, friendship and hospitality (read more here if you’re interested!). So the pineapple hand-drying towel pattern was created. And since it is a symbol of friendship, it must be shared ^_^

I used Bernat Handicrafter Cotton in “Lemon Swirl” and “Sage Green”. I wish I could find a brighter yellow and a lighter green, but there weren’t any other kind of worsted cotton at the Michaels I visited. But I think overall it still looks like a pineapple.

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This pattern uses both knitting and crochet. Crochet is only used in the top (green, hanging) part. It’s not complicated, just involves making chains, single crochet and slip stitch.

I used two 4.5 mm straight needles and a 3.5 mm crochet hook. Also used tapestry needle for sewing and a 1-inch button.

Knit — pineapple body:

First, download the free Circle Cloth pattern from Hakucho. (I know it’s a bit annoying to go back and forth between two patterns, but the knitting pattern isn’t mine so I don’t want to reproduce it here — so please bear with me >_<)

With green, CO 14.

Row 1: p all stitches.

Row 2: kfb all stitches (28 st).

Rows 3–8: Attach yellow, work pattern rows 3–8 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 9: Switch to green, work pattern row 9 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 10: k2, *k1fb, k1*, repeat from * to * across until last 3 st, k3 (40 st).

Rows 11–12: Work pattern rows 11–12 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 13–18: Switch to yellow, work pattern rows 3–8 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 19–22: Switch to green, work pattern rows 9–12 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 23–28: With yellow, work pattern rows 13–18 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Rows 29–32: With green, work pattern rows 19–22 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Now there should be 3 sections of yellow completed.

Repeat pattern rows 3–22 in Circle Cloth pattern 3 more times. Then repeat pattern rows 3–8 once more. There should be 10 sections of yellow altogether. Fasten off yellow.

Pineapple top row 1: With green, work pattern row 9 in Circle Cloth pattern.

Row 2: k1, k2tog to last st, k1.

Row 3: p1, p2tog to last st, p1. (11 st.)

Row 4: k all st.

Row 5: p all st.

BO all st, don’t fasten off. Insert crochet hook in last remaining loop.

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Crochet — pineapple top:

The pineapple top is crocheted in loops. We’ll first make 2 loops attached to the pineapple top, then make 3 longer loops going from the pineapple top and attached together at the top creating a buttonhole tap, and end with 2 loops attached to the pineapple top, like so…

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Loop 1: From where we left off in the knitting part, ch 25, sc in same st at beginning of ch. When crocheting into the knit part, be sure to insert hook through both loops in the BO stitches.

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Loop 2: ch 25, sc in next BO st.

Loop 3: sc in next BO st, ch 42, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 5 ch, ch 35, sc in next BO st at pineapple top.

Loop 4: sc in next BO st, ch 35, sc in each sc in the 6-sc row that was made in loop 3, ch 1, turn (turning ch does not count as a st), sc in first sc, ch 3, skip 3 sc, sc in next 2 sc, ch 35, sc in next BO st.

Loop 5: sc in next BO st, ch 35, sc in next 2 sc at top of loop 4, 3 sc in next ch 3 sp, sc in last sc, ch 1, turn, sc in next 6 sc, ch 35, sc in next BO st.

Loop 6: sc in next BO st, ch 25, sc in next BO st.

Loop 7: ch 25, sl st in same st at beginning of ch, fasten off. Weave in ends.

Sew button to the knit part of the pineapple top. And we’re done! :D

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Hope you like the project and have fun if you do give it a try. Have a fabulous first week of October! :D

 

hongdae

So named because I tried working with this yarn on a project while staying in Hongdae, Seoul, and because this hipster mustard yellow seems to go well with the neighbourhood that is known for its urban arts and many indie cafes.

I ended up frogging the project that I was working on while in Hongdae. In the meanwhile, the Ginkgo pattern has been getting a lot of traffic lately and I’ve been thinking about doing a crochet-only remake for those who are not really into sewing. So I thought I’d use this yarn for a new pattern.

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As with all of my patterns, I made the garment to fit me, but it doesn’t involve much shaping at all and I think it’d be pretty easy to adjust size.

Closer up of the lace pattern :D

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I used:
Mirasol IllarisDK weight 100% cotton, 5 skeins, 580 yards (you’d need more yarn if you were making a larger size)
4.5 mm hook
Tapestry needle

Finished measurements:
Bust 30″
Length 20.5″
Length — shoulder to underarm 7″
collar width 9″

Gauge: 6 dc = approx. 1″
To adjust size, add or decrease multiples of 6 ch in foundation ch.
One could also make it wider for a cap-sleeve boxy-top look.

Pattern:

Front:

ch 63

Row 1 (RS): dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in every ch across, turn (61 dc).

Row 2–33: ch 3 (counts as 1 dc throughout), dc in every dc across, turn.

Start lace pattern: 

Row 1: ch 1 (does not count as a st), sc in first dc, *ch 2, sk 2 dc, dc in next dc, ch 2, dc in same dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, sc in next dc* repeat from * to * till end of row, turn.

Row 2: ch 5 (counts as dc and ch 2), dc in first sc, ch 2, sc in ch 2 sp, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sk next ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * till last sc of row, ch 2, dc in last sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sk next ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to *, ending with sc in 3rd ch of turning ch, turn.

Rows 4–12: Repeat rows 2–3 four more times, then row 2 once more.

Left shoulder:

Row 1: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * two more times, turn.

Row 2: ch 2, sk first ch 2 sp, sc in next ch 2 sp, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * once more, ch 2, dc in last sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, sc in first dc, *ch 2, dc in next sc, ch 2, dc in same sc, ch 2, sc in next ch 2 sp*, repeat from * to * once more, turn.

Row 4: ch 1, sc in first sc, [sc in ch 2 sp, sc in dc] twice, sc in ch 2 sp, 2 sc in sc, [sc in ch 2 sp, sc in dc] twice, sc in ch 2 sp, sc in last sc. Fasten off.

Right shoulder:

Attach yarn to the beginning of row 12 of lace pattern at the 3rd ch of turning ch. Work the same as left shoulder.

Back:

Work the same as front until shoulders. Repeat lace pattern row 3, then row 2.

Left shoulder: Work rows 3–4 of shoulder for front.

Right shoulder: Attach yarn to the beginning of row 14 of lace pattern at the 3rd ch of turning ch. Work the same as left shoulder.

Assembly:

With wrong sides together, sew shoulder seams together.

With wrong sides together, sew side seams together, starting at the base of the 2nd dc row below the start of the lace pattern, and sewing to the bottom edge of the garment.

Turn garment right side out. Work one row of sc evenly around the collar, basically working 1 sc in each dc, sc, and ch 2 sp. Then work one row of sc evenly around each of the armholes. I find that it turns out pretty even when I work 1 sc in each row-end, and 1 sc in a space between 2 rows.

Weave in all ends. And we’re finished :)

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As always if you spot any mistakes or have any questions please feel free to drop me a note, and I will correct or try my best to assist!

Happy first week of summer!

 

 

ode to nyan cat

Needed to make myself a new wallet, I thought I’d make something fun :D

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The Nyan Cat pop-tart! :D

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That’s not really a wallet, one might say. More like a cardholder, one might also say. I guess one could use it as a card holder. I made myself a tiny wallet this size when I started working at a coffee shop nearly a decade ago. There were no lockers in the backroom, so I made a wallet that would fit in my jeans pocket, so that it’s always on my person as I worked. I’ve been using the small wallet ever since. My bank cards and IDs fit snugly in it. And the few bills I have I’d just fold them up to fit them in.

In case anyone finds a crocheted case of this size useful, I’ve made a chart! :D And a few notes describing how I made it.

chart

The finished size is about 2.5″ x 3.5″.

I used worsted weight yarn in tan, pink and dark pink, a 3mm hook, and a tapestry needle.

  1. With tan, ch 13
  2. sc in every ch across (12 sc)
  3. Repeat row 2
  4. Begin following the chart adding the pink and dark pink, using stranded crochet technique*
  5. At the end of the chart, you’d have 18 rows altogether. Don’t fasten off, crochet 18 more rows with tan. Fasten off, leaving a long tail for sewing.
  6. With wrong side out, fold the piece in half crosswise, sew the sides together. Weave in ends, turn right side out.

*Tips on stranded crochet for this project:

  • The first row incorporating pink (3rd row of chart) is wrong side, as are all the rows with just pink.
  • All the rows incorporating both pink and dark pink are right side.
  • Changing colours: in the stitch before new colour, yo and draw up a loop with old colour, yo with new colour and pull through loops on hook.
  • Carry the strands of colours not in use as you crochet and wrap the strands in the stitches you make. When working on the right side, carry the strands of yarn on the back of the work. When working on the wrong side, carry the strands of yarn in the front of the work.

Do let me know if you have any questions! :)

Have a good rest of the week and weekend, everyone!

 

 

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