slow: hats

I’ve made quite a few of these hats with crochet slip stitch. I like that they’re made slowly. 

I’m going to attempt to write the pattern for 3 different yarn weights, so it’s versatile for whatever yarn you have on hand. They all make a hat that is 19″ around and 11″ in length (with brim unfolded). The stitch is quit stretchy so it will fit most I think. Here’s the worsted weight version on me.

And the worsted weight version on Mike (I have a smaller head than he does).

This is the sport weight version.

After testing the sport weight version with a leftover skein of acrylic yarn, I treated myself to a skein of merino hand-dyed by Toronto Yarn Hop co-organizer Emily Gillies. She has a range of beautiful colours, and one skein of merino sport is perfect for making one hat. 

I made the hat in blue spruce (pictured here, in first photo, and in process photos below). The wonderful custom vegan tag is by Millie Marty Co. in Belleville, ON.

The hat can also be made more quickly in bulky yarn. I tested it while attending the Warming Toronto event (an afternoon of hanging out with great folks at a local pub while making hats, scarfs and mittens for distribution at emergency shelters in the winter). And this hat took about 3.5 hours to make.

Dimension of all three versions (sport, worsted, bulky): 19″ around, 11″ in length with brim unfolded. 

Suggested yarn:

Sport — Merino Sport by Emily Gillies, 1 skein, 282 yards

Worsted — Patons Classic Wool Worsted, 2 skeins, 210 yards each

Bulky — Patons Shetland Chunky, 2 skeins, 148 yards each

Pattern:

Instructions are for sport weight (worsted and bulky in parenthesis).

The turning ch does not count as a stitch.

The hats are made with slip stitch in black loop only (BLO), made sideways with short rows for crown shaping, then seamed at the back with slip stitch (or sewing).

Crochet loosely, otherwise it can be difficult to get the hook into the slip stitches.

The hat can be made wider with one or two additional short rows, and longer with additional stitches in the beginning chain (makes for a wider brim).

Hooks: 
Sport — 5.5 mm
Worsted — 6.5 mm
Bulky — 10 mm

Row 1 (setup row): ch 55 (40, 33), sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in each ch to end.

First set of short rows:

Row 2: ch 1, sl st in each st until there is one st left, skip remaining st, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, skip first st, sl st in each st to end. 

Repeat rows 2 and 3 six (four, three) more times.

Next row: ch 1, sl st in each st. At this point the piece will look like this.

Continue on and sl st into each end of the short row and the space in between each row — 14 (10, 8) stitches across the short rows, then sl st in the remaining last stitch from row 2. The piece will now look like this.

Next row*: ch 1, sl st in each st to end.

Second set of short rows:

Row 1: ch 1, sl st in each st until there are 14 (10, 8) stitches left in the row, turn.

Row 2: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Row 3: ch 1, sl st in every st, then sl st in the next two st in the row marked with * (the row made before row 1 of the second set of short rows), turn.

Repeat rows 2 and 3 six (four, three) more times.

Next row: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Repeat first and second sets of short rows four more times. Don’t fasten off.

Crochet seam together right side out. Turn inside out. Weave yarn through each stitch in crown opening, cinch and tied off. Weave in ends. Turn right side out. Fold up brim.  

Happy crocheting!

 

Note: No incentive or commission was received for this post. Simply thought it was neat that I could find local artisans for both the yarn and custom tags, and want to support indie businesses :)

 

 

slow: mitts

Really enjoying working with slip stitch after making the lunar new year bamboo. I like the slower pace of working up the fabric with this stitch. And I figured it would be a dense enough stitch to make a warm pair of mittens.

I used:

Worsted weight yarn

5.5 mm hook, and a smaller hook for weaving in ends

Tapestry needle

The mitten is crocheted flat in one piece, folded in half at the thumb, and seamed together from the tip of the thumb to the cuff edge. The photos that follow will help make sense of the construction.

All sl st worked through back loop only (BLO).

Mitten measures 9″ long, 4″ across palm, 3″ across wrist, 2″ length of thumb. I have relatively small hands. The mittens can be made larger with additional ch in the beginning and beginning ch of thumb, and additional rows between rows 7 and 15 

Pattern:

Row 1: ch 23, sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in every ch to end, ch 2 (these two extra ch increase the length by 1 st). 

Row 2: sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in every st BLO (back loop only) to end.

Row 3: ch 1 (does not count as a stitch), sl st in every st to end, ch 2.

Row 4: repeat row 2.

Row 5: repeat row 3.

Row 6: repeat row 2 (25 st altogether).

Row 7–15: ch 1, sl st in ever st BLO to end.  

Row 16: ch 1, sk first st, sl st in next st and every st to end (skipping the first st decreases 1 st).

Row 17: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Row 18: repeat row 16.

Row 19: repeat row 17.

Row 20: repeat row 16.

Row 21: repeat row 17 (22 st altogether). 

Row 22 (thumb begins): ch 1, sl st in the first 12 st, ch 7, sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in every ch BLO, sl st in next st on the side of mitten.

Thumb row 1: ch 1, sl st in every st on thumb to end (8 st on thumb)

Thumb row 2: ch 1, sl st in every st on thumb, sl st in next st on the side of mitten.

Repeat thumb rows 1 and 2 three more times. 

Continue working 10 rows on thumb, without attaching the end of the row to the side of the mitten.

Don’t fasten off. ch 13, sl st in second ch on hook, sl st in every ch, work 5 sl st across the base of the 10 rows of them that are not attached to the body of the mitten, work 5 sl st into the remaining 5 st in the side of the mitten. It will end up looking like this with the thumb folded in half.

Repeat rows 2 to 21 of mitten. I found that it was easier to fold the thumb in half and pin it together as I worked along so I don’t get confused about which direction I was going.

Fasten off. 

Cuff: Attach yarn to edge of cuff (directly opposite of where last row ended), ch 11, sc in second ch from hook to end of ch, sl st in next stitch in the mitten that looks like a “v”, sl st in next st that looks like a “v”, sc BLO in every sc to end. The mitten here is pictured upside down with the first cuff row started. 

Continue across the edge of the cuff. Here is a close up of the hook pointing at the middle of the stitch that looks like a “v”.

Attach yarn at the top of thumb. Weave yarn through all the stitches in top of thumb, cinch and tie off. Continue seaming down the thumb and around the mitten to edge of cuff. Fasten off and weave in ends. 

The mittens are actually fairly quick to work up. If you’re in/near Toronto, consider joining us in the annual Warming Toronto event on Sunday, February 9. We spend an afternoon at at a pub downtown, knit, crochet, loom, have a pint, share snacks, chatter, and make hats, mitts, scarfs, cowls, etc. for distribution at emergency shelters over the winter months. If one mitten is finished at home first, one can definitely finish the pair while hanging out for a few hours at the event.  

Stay warm! ❄