may the porg be with you

I made a tiny porg!

Fan opinions about them seem to polarize. I happen to love them like I love all fuzzy round-shaped creatures. Its shape is so amigurumi-ready, and it reminded me of my penguin tots. I couldn’t help but had to make one. 

If you’ve made the penguin tots before, the porg is not different structurally but a bit more complicated with the colour changes.

It’s very carry-able and rides well in pocket, so it can always be with you :)

The upturned mouth of the actual porg makes my tiny version look sad, so I opted for a regular mouth instead. 

Here it is contemplating life, or deciding what to eat for lunch, by the jade plant.

To make your own tiny porg, you’ll need:

Small amount of mustard, white, brown and orange yarn in worsted weight

3.5 mm hook 

2.5 mm hook (for feet and weaving in ends)

2 black safety eyes (3mm), or round black beads

Black thread and sewing needle

Yarn needle

Yarn ends (for stuffing), or polyester stuffing

Pattern:

Body:

Note: beginning ch 1 does not count as a stitch throughout.

Round 1: With brown, ch 4, 2 sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next ch, 3 sc in last ch, sc in the remaining loop of the next ch (the ch that has only 1 sc in it), sc in the next ch (the ch with the beginning 2 sc in it), sl st in first sc of round.

Round 2: ch 1, 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 3 sc, 3 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc, sc in next sc (the sc with the beginning 2 sc in it), sl st in first sc of round.

In the next round we begin to incorporate other colours. Here’s a tutorial on how to change colours seamlessly, in case it’s helpful.

Round 3: ch 1, in back loop only, sc in next 7 sc. When completing the 7th sc, attach and change to white. Carrying the brown yarn (i.e. wrap it in your stitch) as you crochet with white, sc in the next 4 sc. When completing the 4th sc, change back to brown, sc in last sc, sl st in first sc.

Round 4: With brown, ch 1, sc in next 7 sc, change to white, carrying the brown as you go, sc in next 4 sc, change to brown, sc in last sc, sl st in first sc.

Round 5: Repeat round 4.

Round 6: With brown, ch 1, sc in next 6 sc. Change to yellow and carrying brown as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to white and carry the brown and yellow as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to yellow and carry the brown as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to brown, sl st in first sc.

Round 7: Repeat around 6.

After round 7, install safety eyes (or sew on beads for eyes) in between the 2 yellow stitches between rounds 6 and 7. Sew on mouth. Stuff with yarn ends or stuffing.

Round 8: With brown, ch 1, 2 sc tog three times, change to yellow and fasten off brown, 2 sc tog with yellow, change to white and carry the yellow as you go, 2 sc tog with white, change to yellow and fasten off white, 2 sc tog with yellow, sl st in first sc of round, fasten off, leave a long tail. Weave the tail in the remaining stitches around and cinch the opening close, secure and fasten off, weave in ends.

Wings (make 2): With brown, ch 2, 5 sc in 2nd ch from hook, ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook (forming a point), sc in ch with the 5 sc in it, sl st in first sc of round, leave a tail for sewing, fasten off. (I only leave a tail for sewing on one wing, not both.

Sew on wings: Position the wing with the yarn tail for sewing on the side of the body, thread the yarn needle in the yarn tail, insert needle where you want the first wing, pull the needle through the body so the needle comes out on the other side where you want the other wing to be. Thread the other wing through the needle, and sew back and forth through the body to secure both wings at the same time. Fasten off, weave in ends.

Feet:

Feet are made linked together with a few ch in between.

With orange, *ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in very first ch made, ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sl st in very first ch made*, ch 2 (link between feet), then repeat from * to * once more. Fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing.

Position feet under body and sew on with yarn tail, fasten off and weave in ends.

The porg is ready for adventures!

Tiny porg wishes everyone an awesome week!

 

this week’s awesome finds

Just because the holidays are over doesn’t mean the home can’t smell festive! Easy to make wax sachets from Hello Glow.

 

This cozy cardigan was made with a round knitting loom! Must try. From Good Knit Kisses.

 

Good night’s sleep and relaxation in a bottle makes a great homemade gift :) Pillow mist from Let’s Mingle.

 

 

Oh my goodness, a gorgeous cable sweater and it’s free! Crochet pattern by Sewrella.

 

Lion Brand Yarn has come up with some designs that I really like lately, such as this simple, relaxed-looking cardigan.

 

And this nice cowl — perfect for practicing cables and I like it’s clever construction.

 

These felted cats! Made using a cookie cutter! Brilliant! Tutorial from Cat at Roof.

 

One of my favourite things from the Last Jedi :D Pattern by The Geeky Hooker on Ravelry.

 

I think I’ve probably posted this before but it’s so awesome, no one would mind if I post it again! Cord tacos as easy to make as real tacos :D From Local Adventurer

 

Hope everyone’s having an awesome weekend! Stay crafty :D

 

 

happy scrappy sweater

Start the new year right! Use up those scrap yarn to make room for new ones! :D

And get some knitting looms! So you can make this happy scrappy loom-knitting sweater! :D

*Disclaimer: I have not received compensations for any knitting loom manufacturers* (but maybe I should…)

I just… love the simplicity, the rustic fisherman look, the double thick, super warm fabric.

So! If you have a knitting loom, or if you’d like to get one and try your hands on loom knitting, here’s how this raglan sweater was made. 

(Haven’t tried loom knitting much but want to tackle a sweater project? No fear! I’ll have video tutorials throughout to show you different stitches. I did start with making hats and headbands first but the sweater really isn’t much harder.)

I used:

A 41-peg round loom (the largest in the set). I got mine in a set by Loops & Threads at Michaels (for medium to bulky yarn). It was about $20 and I had a 55% off coupon so it ended up being quite affordable.

Worsted weight yarn. I knitted with 2 strands of yarn held together throughout. I had a large ball of over 1000 yards of forest green (I can’t remember what brand and lost the label) that I used throughout, then just added different colours of scrap yarn as I went. 

6 mm crochet hook for casting on. Smaller hook for weaving in ends.

Yarn needle (that came with the loom set).

Sizing:

The size I made was 33″ around. I would have liked it larger. Given that I’m on the small scale of humans, I’m going to write the pattern for 37″ so it might work for more people. 37″ is the largest size the loom can make, for this pattern. Below are the approximate measurements, with 2 stitches = 1″ and 3 rows = 1″. The actual measurements for your sweater may vary depending on the kind of yarn you use.

Pattern:

Notes: 

Knit with 2 strands of yarn held together throughout. I used one colour consistently and just added different colours of scrap yarn. To change colour, I simply cut the working yarn and tie on a different colour. Very high-tech ;)

The pattern consists of 4 pieces: front, back, 2 sleeves. They’re sewn together in the 4 diagonal seams from under arm to collar, then sleeves are sewn together under the arm, and the sides are sewn together. 

Wherever “knit” or “k” is indicated in the pattern, it means the e-wrap stitch.

Front/Back (make 2):

Cast on all the pegs around the loom using this chain cast on method with a crochet hook, but don’t join in the round. I tend to cast on quite tightly so that the edges are as neat as possible (41 sts.)

Work k1 p1 rib for 6 rows. (video tutorial for k1 p1 rib here)

Continue knitting using the e-wrap stitch (e-wrap video here) until piece reach 13″.  

Now we begin decreasing towards the collar (yoke).

Yoke row 1: In the next row, decrease 1 by moving the loop on the last peg to the one next to it, e-wrap and knit off the 2 bottom loops on peg. Continue knitting until 2 stitches remain. Move the loop on the last peg to the second last peg, e-wrap and knit off the 2 bottom loops on peg. Decrease done! Simple, right? (Here’s a decrease video to summarize the action)

Yoke rows 2–3: Knit 2 rows even.

Repeat yoke rows 1–3 eight more times, then work yoke row 1 (decrease row) once more. 28 rows in yoke altogether, 21 stitches remain.

Work k1 p1 rib for 5 rows. 

Bind off (bind off video here).

Sleeves (make 2):

Chain cast on (same as front/back) 19 sts. 

Work k1 p1 rib for 5 rows.

Sleeve row 1–7: Knit 7 rows even.

Sleeve row 8 (increase): knit 2, make 1 (m1), knit until 2 stitches remain, m1, knit 2. (make 1 video here — the person in the video uses a different knit stitch method but you can continue using the e-wrap for this)

Repeat sleeve rows 1–8 seven more times — 64 rows altogether, increased to 35 sts.

Now we decrease for shoulder.

Shoulder row 1: knit 1 row even.

Shoulder row 2: decrease 1, knit till 2 stitches remain, decrease (see yoke row 1 above).

Repeat shoulder rows 1–2 thirteen more times, 28 rows altogether in shoulder, 7 stitches remain.

Work k1 p1 rib for 5 rows. Bind off.

Assembly:

With wrong side facing, and using one strand of yarn only (to reduce bulk), sew raglan seams together connecting sleeve pieces to front and back pieces. Sew sleeve together under the arm and continue sewing together the sides. Repeat with other sleeve/side.

Voilà!

And! I got this incredible t-rex wooden sculpture from a dear friend :D Isn’t it the most awesome thing?

If you do give it a try do drop me a line! Cheers to a fantastic roaring year!