this week’s levitation

levitate9

I’m really rather proud of this one.

 

levitate10

Inspired by this quote:
“Drinking a cup of tea, I stop the war.” — Stephen Levine

 

Photo 2013-03-27 11 28 14 PM

Test shot, but I liked how it turned out.

 

Photo 2013-03-27 11 31 02 PM

Double levitation! Need more practice, but it was fun :D

 

levitate13

In my parents’ backyard, enjoying one of the first warm days of spring.

 

levitate14

Saying hi to my neighbours in the building across the street.

 

Float on! :D

 

 

 

 

 

 

this week’s awesome finds

Very cute felted wool rings from Dans le Townhouse.

 

Love the burnt meringue on top! Spotted on Ravelry.

 

A painting a day, on a petri dish. Each a stunningly beautiful universe. By Klari Reis.

 

Perler bead bow tie! :D From Morning Creativity.

 

Stylish t-shirt dress for tots. My niece would look so adorable in it. I’m sure I can also modify the pattern to make one big enough for me :P From Pardon my Chaos.

 

This is hilarious and so awesome, makes great party hats! From Having Fun at Home.

 

Cheerful bike seat cover from And Sew We Craft.

 

May your weekend be filled with peace and the hope of growth and new life that the spring season brings!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(almost) daily levitation

levitate2

 

I’ve long been fascinated by Natsumi Hayashi’s levitation photos. I have recurring dreams about floating around in air, and her photos just reminds me so much of those dreams. 

It’s pretty good exercise, I think, jumping repeatedly to get a good photo. Given that I don’t really exercise at all, I try to not to strain myself by taking just one picture a day. You can see my very first attempt in this post. The picture above is a second attempt. Mike joined in the fun too :D

levitate1

 

My subsequent attempts over the week. Lounging around on my day off…

levitate3

 

Getting some yarn…

levitate4

 

My best attempt yet! So proud of this one. Love the little clouds in the corner, and Flash Point on TV!

levitate5

 

My most recent attempt. Tea time (please excuse the bag of garbage waiting to go out…).

levitate6

 

I got a lot of inspirations from this photographer, a fellow Canadian from Vancouver! :D 

Also, check out this interview of Natsumi Hayashi on the New York Times blog! So many people in the comments also said that they have flying dreams. What would Jung say about that…

Hoping to levitate outdoors on the grass when the snow melts!

Have a splendid Sunday, everyone!

 

Alright don’t worry even if things end up a bit too heavy
We’ll all float on alright.
– Modest Mouse

 

 

sideways

sideways

Sideways is a pullover that is worked in one piece in a sideways manner, from one sleeve cuff to the other, forming a herringbone-like pattern. Then it is folded in half along the shoulders, with the side underarm seams sewn together. 

 

sideways diagram

 

I bought a giant ball of cheap and cheerful Red Heart acrylic to experiment while making up this pattern. Turned out a little stiff but I don’t mind it. But I would imagine it would look rather nice with a yarn that has a nicer drape, like Caron Simply Soft or Bernat Satin.

Yarn: worsted weight, approx. 700 yd 

Hook: 6.5mm, 5.5mm

Measurements:
Bust: 38“
Length: 18″ 
Sleeve length (underarm to sleeve cuff): 13“
Neck opening: 15″

My pattern writing ability is limited so I don’t want to attempt making different sizes. But here are some simple ways that I can think of for alteration:

To make smaller sizes I would suggest using a DK or sport weight yarn with a 4.5 mm hook and using the pattern as is.

To make larger sizes I would suggest increasing the number of foundation chains by multiples of 4, and then adding more rows in between increases and decreases in the sleeves, and adding more “work in pattern” rows in the middle of front and back.

More notes…

This pattern hasn’t been tested, and it’s written from a crude diagram that I drew while crocheting. I tried to elaborate as much as possible when writing it out, and it’s a very simple pattern repeat, but some experience in crocheting is required to understand the abbreviated parts of the pattern (i.e. where it says “work in pattern”). The basic pattern repeat is rows 2–3. It would be pretty obvious what you need to do once you get the hang of the pattern repeat, but probably not a beginner’s project.

In the pattern wherever it says dc into a ch 2 or ch 1 space I actually crochet into the chain to make the fabric less bulky/stiff given the yarn I was using, but you can just crochet into the ch 2 or ch 1 space too, if you prefer.

Ok… on to the pattern.

 

Pattern

Sleeve, with larger hook

Row 1: ch 36, dc in 4th ch from hook, dc in next ch, ch 2, sk 2 ch, *dc in next two ch, ch 2, sk 2 ch*, rep from * to *, end with dc in last two ch, turn.

Row 2: ch 4, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, *ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp*, rep from * to *, end with ch 1, dc in top of last dc, turn.

Row 3: ch 3, dc in next ch 1 sp, ch 2, *2 dc in next ch 2 sp, ch 2*, rep from * to *, end with dc in last ch 1 sp, dc in top of last dc, turn.

Row 4 (increase row): ch 3, dc in same st, ch 2, *2 dc in next ch 2 sp, ch 2*, rep from * to *, end with 2 dc in top of last dc, turn.

Rows 5–16: repeat rows 2–4 four times

Row 17: repeat row 2

Body

Row 18: repeat row 3, don’t turn at the end of the row, ch 44, remove hook from look, don’t fasten off. Attach a separate ball of yarn at top of ch in the beginning of row, ch 41, fasten off.

Row 19: place hook back in the loop at the end of row 18, turn. ch 3, dc in next ch, ch 2, sk next 2 ch, *dc in next two ch, ch 2, sk next 2 ch*, rep from * to *, end with 2 dc in final two ch, turn.

Row 20: ch 4, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, *ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp*, rep from * to *, end with ch 1, dc in top of last dc, turn.

Row 21: ch 3, dc in next ch 1 sp, ch 2, *2 dc in next ch 2 sp, ch 2*, rep from * to *, end with dc in last ch 1 sp, dc in top of last dc, turn.

Row 22–25: repeat rows 20–21 twice.

Front

Row 26 (decrease, neck shaping): mark the midpoint across body, which is the 18th set of 2-dc. Repeat row 20, end with 2 dc in the ch 2 sp before midpoint, dc in next dc, turn.

Row 27 (decrease, neck shaping): ch 3, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 28 (decrease, neck shaping): work in pattern until last ch 2 sp, 2 dc in last ch 2 sp, dc in top of turning ch, turn.

Row 29: ch 4, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 30: work in pattern until turning ch from last row, dc in 4th ch of turning ch, dc in 3rd st of turning ch, turn.

Row 31–33: work in pattern.

Row 34 (increase, neck shaping): work in pattern until last two st, dc in last two st, dc again in last st, turn.

Row 35 (increase, neck shaping): ch 3, dc in next dc, ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 36 (increase, neck shaping): work in pattern until last ch 2 sp, 2 dc in last ch 2 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in top of turning ch, fasten off.

Back

Row 26 (decrease, neck shaping): attach yarn at midpoint. ch 3, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 27 (decrease, neck shaping): work in pattern until the last ch 2 sp, dc in last ch 2 sp, 2 dc-tog in ch 2 sp and turning ch, turn.

Row 28 (decrease, neck shaping): ch 3, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 29: work in pattern until last ch 2 sp, 2 dc in last ch 2 sp, ch 1, dc in turning ch, turn.

Rows 30: ch 3, dc in ch 1 sp, ch 2, work in pattern to end, turn.

Rows 31–33: work in pattern.

Row 34 (increase, neck shaping): ch 4, dc in first dc, dc in next ch 1 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Row 35 (increase, neck shaping): work in pattern until last ch 2 sp, 2 dc in last ch 2 sp, ch 2, dc in 4th ch of turning ch, dc in 3rd ch of turning ch, turn.  

Row 36 (increase, neck shaping): ch 4, dc in first dc, dc in next ch 1 sp, ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

Body, joining front and back

Row 37: work in pattern until last ch 2 sp of BACK, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, ch 2, [dc in top of turning ch of BACK, dc in the first dc of FRONT], ch 2, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern to end, turn.

*Tie the bases of the two stitches in square brackets together with a short length of yarn*

Rows 38–44: work in pattern. There should be 35 pairs of 2-dc across the front and back of body on the rows that begin and end with a pair of 2-dc. Fasten off at the end of row 44. Turn.

Sleeve

Row 45: Join yarn in ch 2 sp after the 11st pair of dc’s, ch 3, dc in same ch 2 sp, *ch 2, dc in next ch 2 sp* 13 times. Turn.

Row 46: work in pattern.

Row 47: ch 2, dc in first ch 1 sp, ch 1, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern till last ch 2 sp, 2 dc in last ch 2 sp, ch 1, 2 dc tog in 4th ch and 3rd ch of turning ch. Turn.

Row 48: ch 3, dc in next ch 1 sp, 2 ch, 2 dc in next ch 2 sp, work in pattern till last ch 1 sp, dc in ch 1 sp, dc in top of turning ch. Turn.

Rows 49–61: repeat rows 46–48 four times.

Rows 62–63: work in pattern. Fasten off at the end of row 63.

The entire sweater is now finished! We’re almost there :D

Finishing

Fold sweater in half along shoulder line with right sides facing together (which ever side looks better to you can be the “right side”), sew side and underarm seams together. Turn right side out.

Using the smaller hook, crochet a round of hdc evenly around each sleeve cuff and neck opening, and a round of tr around bottom edge of sweater. (2 st in each end of row seems to work out pretty evenly for me.) 

Weave in ends, put on sweater and be cozy :D

 

sideways 2

Please don’t hesitate to drop me a note if there’s anything unclear or if you spot any mistakes in the pattern.

Have a wonderful week, everyone!

 

  

reflections on wild geese

levitation attempt

 

That was my best shot at levitating so far. 

I was actually trying to take photos of a sweater I crocheted (in one piece in a sideways manner, I’m hoping to post the pattern soon). The way I positioned the camera was too low and couldn’t capture the entire skirt, so I decided to take a jumping shot, inspired by Natsumi Hayashi’s levitating self-portraits.

Having been following Natsumi’s posts for a couple of years, I’ve found that the key to levitation (as opposed to just jumping) in a photo shoot is that one has to jump while relaxing one’s shoulders and arms. 

It’s actually quite difficult. A lot of controlled coordination needs to happen in a fraction of a second.

In this photo I certainly still looked like I was jumping, but I like the way my arm and hand look in the light.

***

I’ve been stressed on many fronts lately. 

The paradox of jumping — a surge of energy to propel oneself off the ground against gravity — while being relaxed was actually quite enlightening when I thought about my recent encounters with conflict.

What this makes me realize is that, in conflict, I have to learn to sustain a clear and calm state of mind in the face of heightened emotions. Heightened emotions that threatens to derail my thoughts and actions.

It’s actually quite difficult.

***

Realizing that it’s difficult, and fearing that it might be impossible for me to ever do well, I find this poem comforting.

Wild Geese

You do not have to be good.
You do not have to walk on your knees
For a hundred miles through the desert, repenting.
You only have to let the soft animal of your body
love what it loves.

Tell me about despair, yours, and I will tell you mine.
Meanwhile the world goes on.
Meanwhile the sun and the clear pebbles of the rain
are moving across the landscapes,
over the prairies and the deep trees,
the mountains and the rivers.

Meanwhile the wild geese, high in the clean blue air,
are heading home again.
Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
the world offers itself to your imagination,
calls to you like the wild geese, harsh and exciting –
over and over announcing your place
in the family of things.

– Mary Oliver

 

May we all find clarity and compassion today.

 

 

this week’s awesome finds

 Awesome yarn-bombing idea. More on Carmichael Collective.

 

 So CUTE! Makes a great pocket on a coat or cardigan, I think. From Repeat Crafter Me.

 

 Best thing ever! I’m going to have to make this before my next road trip. Sewing pattern for tentacle neck pillow from Tally’s Treasury.

 

 Very hip and elegant single stem rosette necklace, from Bored & Crafty.

 

 Bunny gloves! I love the bow tie. Pattern from Devin Cole.

 

 This sheep needs to live on my couch. Knitting pattern from The Purl Bee.

 

 I didn’t know about the apparently really widespread grumpy cat meme before coming across this, but I just LOVE this grumpy cat pin from LDP! I think I have to make one to keep me company when I’m feeling grumpy.

 

 How awesome is this party hat from Oh Happy Day? You can even add the candle to make it extra extra festive :D

 

Have a happy week! :D

 

 

an angler fish named grace

grace 2

An angler fish named Grace, grateful for the light before its path.

It’s made from a pattern from this book, but the pattern is also online for free :D

The pattern uses ribbon for teeth, but I don’t have that kind of ribbon, so I crocheted them with thread. I’m quite happy with how they turned out. And the mouth is lined with black felt.

teeth

 

She looks rather happy :D

grace 1

 

Have a great week!