fab kimono

A quick kimono style cardigan/shrug I pulled together to wear to my cousin’s wedding this weekend :) Can’t come up with a more poetic name, but thought it looks pretty fab (if I do say so myself), so fab kimono it is :D

I had quite a bit of leftover Red Heart Unforgettable after making a scarf as a gift, so I bought another skein to make this. It’s cropped length because I was going to wear this long black dress and wanted some contrasts in style. But it’s easy to make longer if you’d like.

It’s crocheted from side to side, making both front and back pieces at the same time (so there’s no seaming in the middle!). It is then folded in half with just 2 short sides to seam at the end.

With autumn in the air I think this is a good layering piece for wearing with summer dress, t‐shirt, long sleeve shirt, or even buttoned up collared shirt.

Size: 

Length (shoulder to lower edge) — 17″

Around — 60″

Gauge:

16 st = 4.5″

I used:

3 skeins of Red Heart Unforgettable in Dragonfly

6.5 mm hook

Tapestry needle

Smaller hook to weave in ends with

Pattern:

Left front/back:

Row 1: fdc 126 (see instruction for foundation double crochet or fdc here)

To increase length, add 16 fdc for every 4.5″.

Row 2: ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc in next 5 dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, *dc in next 6 dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc* repeat from * to * to end, dc in last 6 dc. 

Repeat row 2 until piece measures 15″ (approx. 26 rows).

Next row: dc in every dc and 2 dc in every 2 ch sp. 

Split right front:

Next row: ch 3, dc in next 62 dc, fdc 63 and leave the remaining dc from previous row unworked.

Repeat row 2 of left front/back until piece measures 15″ from split. 

Last row: dc in every dc and 2 dc in every 2 ch sp. Fasten off.

Assembly:

Fold piece in half so that the split is perpendicular to the fold line. The fold line will be the shoulders. 

Sew side seam together by attaching yarn at the lower edge, matching stitches on front and back pieces, sew together the next 30 dc. Fasten off. Repeat on the other side seam. Weave in ends.

Wear and be fabulous!

 

8‐bit

So earlier in the summer I started writing a number of crochet patterns that I was hoping to compile into an e‐book for sale. But the summer is quickly going by, and I’ve had more freelance work than expected (which is a good thing). So then I realize I don’t realistically have the capacity to pattern‐test, calculate for different sizes, etc. in order to make the patterns sell‐able. So! I’m just going to continue in this blog’s tradition in sharing patterns for free! :D It’s just that it will require some creative/math work if you’re not making the exact same size I’m wearing. But that also means lots of rooms for customization! This is the first of the few patterns I was working on :)

I’ve always wanted to try using corner‐to‐corner (c2c) crochet to make a top. My first idea was a cozy sweater with a dinosaur on it (I might still do that, we’ll see!), but all these heat waves we’ve been having are not conducive to cozy sweater‐making, so I thought I’d try with a lace weight yarn for a breezy summer top. 

The “tiles” made in c2c crochet reminds me of colourful pixels, and Nintendo video games of my childhood, and summer vacation spent playing these games. So I called it “8‐bit”.

It can be worn both ways, either with the buttons on the front, or on the back!

Buttons in the front makes it a cardigan, which can be paired with a spaghetti strap summer dress!

The top is made in 4 pieces then sewn together. So you can also sew the v‐neck pieces together and place the buttons on the round‐neck side.

There is also some shoulder shaping so that the cap sleeves will follow the shoulders rather than stick out. I thought that goes better with the gentle, delicate feel of the lace weight Noro Taiyo.

Size: Bust 36″, armhole depth 7″, neck opening width 8″, total length 17″

Size is easy to adjust as you go with the c2c crochet stitch. There will be tips for adjustment throughout in italics.

Gauge: 5x5 “tiles” = 2“x2”

Material: 

3.5 mm hook, and the smallest hook you have for weaving in ends (mine is 1.5 mm)

Lace weight yarn about 1100 yards (I only used a bit of the second skein of Noro Taiyo Lace, one skein of this is over 900 yards), larger sizes will require more yarn

Seven 1/2″ buttons

Sewing needle

Corner‐to‐corner crochet: this pattern requires familiarity with c2c crochet. If you’ve never used this stitch before, no worries! It’s quite easy and I find it rather meditative too. There are tons of very detailed tutorials out there. I learned from the photo tutorial by One Dog Woof, take a look and use some scrap yarn to practice, and I’m sure you’ll be ready in no time!

Charts:

 

 

Pattern/recipe:

V‐neck piece (make 2):

Start from the lower left corner, tile 1. Continue through chart. Chart is read diagonally. Follow this excellent photo tutorial by One Dog Woof if you need some help!

When there are 22 tiles on both edges, begin decreasing on the right edge by working 1 sl st through each dc just made, and sl st in turning ch, then ch 3, 3 dc in turning ch, and continuing on.

For a larger garment, continue working more tiles until desired width before decreasing. To determine “desired width”, decide on finished bust measurement you’d like for the top. Say 40″. Divide it by 4, which is 10″. Then continue c2c crochet until both edges are 10″ long before decreasing on the right edge. Note the number of tiles you have at the bottom edge when you reach desired width. You will need to have the same number of tiles on the bottom edge of each of the pieces.

Continue increasing on the left edge but decreasing on the right edge until the left edge has 37 tiles. 

For a longer garment, continue increasing on the left edge until desired length. Note the number of tiles when you reach desired length.

Shape shoulder:

Begin decreasing on the left edge after the 37th tile (or desired length). Work one row towards the right edge, then one row towards the left edge. After crocheting the last tile on the top edge, work another tile on top of the previous row (I placed an additional white tile on top of the brown tile of the previous row).

Then, as usual, turn, sl st in next 3 dc, sl st in turning ch.

And continue down the row.

Repeat the above steps for shoulder shaping until shoulder resembles the chart. 

(We’re of course not going to leave the shoulders jagged! We’ll fill in the corners as we sew them together later.)

Then, decrease on both the top edge and the right edge until there are 9 tiles at top edge. End with working loop on the top edge, don’t fasten off.

If you have increased in the bottom edge, increase the same number of tiles at the top edge.

Neck edge:

*Work 3 dc in the corner between first two tiles (where the lower left corner of the tile the working loop is on meets the top right of the next tile), sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row (the neck edge is shown in the next photo). Fasten off.

Round‐neck piece (make 2):

Follow pattern/recipe until neck edge. (making the same increases if you’ve made them in the v‐neck pieces.)

*Work 3 dc in the corner between first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * 3 more times, ch 3, 3 dc in turning ch.

Continue in c2c stitch pattern, decreasing on both edges until there final tile is made, fasten off.

Sew halves together:

Sew together the centre seams of the two round‐neck pieces.

Seaming shoulders:

With wrong side facing, attach yarn to lower edge of shoulder on one piece.

*Work 3 dc in corner between the first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row, don’t fasten off.

With right sides together, place shoulder of v‐neck piece to the shoulder of the round‐neck piece just completed, matching both pieces. With working loop still attached to the round‐neck piece, sl st in top of shoulder of v‐neck piece.

*Work 3 dc in corner between the first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row, leave a long tail for sewing, fasten off. 

Sew entire shoulders together (the slopes we just worked on and the top edges). Repeat on the other shoulder.

The rest of assembly:

With wrong sides facing, sew side seams together. For my top I counted 17 tiles down from shoulder for 7″ in armhole depth, then started sewing to the bottom edge. If making a deeper armhole, measure the desired depth and count the number of tiles within the measurement.

Buttons:

Sew buttons on one edge where the turning ch on the edge will form natural button holes, which is every 4th tile.

Weave in all the ends with a tiny hook, and we’re done! :D

Leave a comment if you have any questions or need clarifications! Happy crocheting!

 

loom‐knit‐along: join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket – part 5

Now that we’ve gotten the hang of making mitered square, you might get a bit bored of making solid colour squares. You can make striped ones! And use up smaller balls of scraps! Here’s what I do…

After casting on, purling one row, decreasing one stitch on either side of the centre peg, and moving each stitch over, introduce the new colour by making a slip knot with the new yarn and placing it on the peg with the first stitch of the row.

Knit over the old yarn (pink), then continue e‐wrapping with the new yarn (blue). Purl one row with the new yarn. Then switch back to the pink yarn.

Lay the working yarn of the previous row on top of the new yarn before making the first e‐wrap to carry the yarn with you as you go. (in this case we’re bringing back the pink yarn and about to make an e‐wrap on the first peg, notice the blue yarn is on top of the pink so it gets wrapped into the stitch.)

When you have 5 stitches left after a purl row, cut the current yarn, and tie off.

Do the decrease around the centre peg and move the stitches over as usual, and complete the square.

Here’s the stripy square!

You can also make scrappy squares that use up every last bits of yarn. I knit till I have about 2 inches left, and tie on a new yarn very close to the peg (I learned this from watching videos of loom knitting plush toys by the Loom Muse — more on that in another post!)

In the photo below the new yarn is the grey one and the one that ran out is green.

The resulting scrappy square looks like this :)

Yes, lots of ends to weave in on these squares but I like the look of them :)

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series of how‐to for making a mitered square blanket! Happy knitting!

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

 

loom‐knit‐along: join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket – part 4

Hello! We’re back with the last step in loom knitting the mitered square blanket, which is to join all the other squares in the blanket after the first row and after the first square of any row. This is how the majority of the squares will be joined!

As always, we orient the loom to the blanket (or in the case of this demonstration, a dish cloth). The square we joined in the last post is the blue square.

The loops marked with the blue dots on the blue square will go on the pegs parked with the blue dots, and the loops marked with the red dots on the yellow square will go on the pegs with the red dots. 

We would begin with placing the loops on the yellow square on the pegs, starting from the edge towards the centre, and starting the first peg that is right beside the side knob. We place the last loop on the yellow square on the peg before the marked centre peg, then place the first loop of the blue square on the marked peg, and the rest of the loops of the blue square onto the pegs until the second last peg of the loom — 23 stitches altogether. 

Here’s a closer look at the loops that are placed on the pegs. Note that the loops that are picked up are the horizontal strands in between purl bumps.

And here’s how it looks on the loom when both yellow and blue squares are attached, with the right side of the square touching the inside of the loom.

When you’re actually knitting with the blanket on your lap, it would be oriented like this. I would start putting on the loops from the black/grey/beige square, which is the square from the previous row, and then put on the loops from the purple/mixed colour square, which is the square made just before the current one.

Now we’re ready to knit the new square as we usually do. We start with adjusting a slip knot on the first peg (the one right beside the side knob), knit off the loop below, then e‐wrap and knit off each stitch.

Instruction for the rest of the square is pasted below, but if you need more help there are photos in the first post.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‐wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. (Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.) 

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‐wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‐wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‐wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‐wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 stitches left. Purl the 3 stitches. Place the stitch on the left and stitch on the right onto the middle peg, e‐wrap, then knit off all 3 bottom loops. Fasten off.

Here’s how my mitered square dish cloth looks like! :D I crocheted a border and loop at the top with a 6.5mm hook, basically 1 single crochet in each stitch around, and 3 sc in each corner.

Next time we’ll have our last post of the series on how to make striped squares, or essentially how I change colours to use up every last bit of those scraps.

You might ask, isn’t there a million ends to weave in at the end? Yes, so I don’t wait till the end. Usually I weave in the ends after making one or two squares. Leaving ALL the ends to weave in after 10x15 squares would drive me mad :S (I plan on making the blanket 10 squares wide and 15 squares tall)

Till next time, happy knitting! 

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

loom‐knit‐along: join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket – part 3

Hello friends! We’re back again with our mitered square blanket! Today we’re going to join the first square on the second row, and the method for joining is the same for the first square in every row. 

Let’s first orient ourselves. For the first square in every row, we will always be joining under the first square in the previous row. In our case, it’s the purple square (in the last post we joined the yellow square). 

We will place the loops on the bottom edge of the purple square (as indicated by the red dots) onto the pegs on the loom that are marked by the red dot, starting at the first peg (the one that’s beside the side knob) and ending at the peg marked with a stitch marker, or the one just before it. So you will put on 11 or 12 loops, it doesn’t make a difference.

To place the loops on the square onto the pegs, find the horizontal strands between the purl bumps, and place the strands onto the pegs.

When actually joining/knitting the square, you would position it like this, with the right side of the square you’re joining to facing the inside of the loop, and picking up the loops on the side this way. (And yes that was a wonderful day knitting in the sun sitting on the grass in a park! :D)

Once the loops are placed onto the peg, make a slip knot with the new yarn (in this demonstration it’s the blue yarn), place it on the first peg, and knit over with the loop on the peg.

E‐wrap the next peg, then knit over. Repeat until there are no loops on the next pegs. Then, e‐wrap the next loop twice and knit off the bottom loop (in this demonstration it is the marked peg, but it can also be the peg after the marked peg if you have placed a loop from the previous square on the marked peg, it doesn’t really make a difference), thereby casting on a stitch.

Continue casting on until the second last peg on the loom — that will be the last stitch, 23 stitches altogether.

You’re now ready to continue making the square as usual. Instructions are pasted below for convenience’s sake but if you need more help there are photos in the first post.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‐wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. (Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.) 

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‐wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‐wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‐wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‐wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 stitches left. Purl the 3 stitches. Place the stitch on the left and stitch on the right onto the middle peg, e‐wrap, then knit off all 3 bottom loops. Fasten off.

Now we have the first square of the row joined! Next time we’ll join the next square, which is how we make the majority of the squares in the blanket.

Be sure to leave a comment on the post if you have any question! You can send me an email too but other readers may also find your questions helpful so don’t be shy :)

Happy weekend!

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

loom‐knit‐along: join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket – part 2

Welcome back to the loom‐knit‐along mitered square blanket project! :D

In this post we knit a second square while joining it to the previous one. Every square on the very first row of the blanket will be made this way. You can make the row as long as you want. My blanket is 10 squares wide, and it’s 39″. 

First, let’s orient ourselves. We will put the loops on one side of the first square onto 12 pegs of the loom, as illustrated in the picture below. The red‐dotted stitches will go on the red‐dotted pegs.

With the right side of the square facing the inside of the loom, start by putting the first stitch at the top of the square onto the marked peg. For the following stitches, use the loom pick to pick up the horizontal strand of yarn between the purl bumps and place it onto the peg, like so…

Continue putting a loop on each peg until you reach the other corner of the square and each of the 12 pegs have a loop on it. It will look like this.

Then, go to the first peg of the loom, and cast on the 11 pegs that don’t have loops on them with a new colour for your new square (my second square is yellow).

When you get to the first peg with a loop of the previous square on it (the marked peg), e‐wrap, then knit off the loop from the previous square.

Continue until the end of row. And that’s it! You’ve cast on a conjoining square! :D

Knit the rest of the square the same way as the first square. For convenience, I’ll paste the pattern below but there are photos in the blog post that might help if you’re having trouble.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‐wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. (Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.) 

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‐wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‐wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‐wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‐wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 stitches left. Purl the 3 stitches. Place the stitch on the left and stitch on the right onto the middle peg, e‐wrap, then knit off all 3 bottom loops. Fasten off.

Now we have two squares joined together! Next time we’ll join a square to the row below. Here’s a first look at how we’ll do that.

In the meanwhile, join as many square as you’d like for the first row, by placing the loops from the previous square on the loom (i.e. if I were to join a third square to the first row, I’d place loops from the yellow square on the loom). Then come back and join us for the second row!

Happy knitting! :D Feel free to leave a comment if you have any questions!

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

loom‐knit‐along: join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket — part 1

I’ve been looking for a good yarn scrap project because I love the patchwork look and my yarn collection is growing at an uncontrollable rate.

I came across a mitered square baby jacket one day so I followed the link to the free pattern, but it involves sewing all the squares together… doable maybe for a baby jacket but I wasn’t into sewing hundreds of squares together to make up a blanket. So I tried looking for visual tutorials for a join‐as‐you‐go version but didn’t come across any. After making the Ten‐Stitch Blanket I was pretty sure it’s possible to join as you go, so I tinkered around a bit and figured out a system!

Interested in knitting along? :D I figure if we start now, and knit one or two squares a day, we’ll have a blanket by Christmas to give away as gift! (or keep for yourself!) You can also use the idea of temperature blanket, mood blanket, or sky blanket. They’re really great ideas to be mindful of our surroundings or our feelings so we don’t take them for granted or be unaware of how things affect us. 

Each square doesn’t take very long to make, only 23 stitches at its widest part, and it keeps decreasing as you go so it feels like it’s knitting up even faster. There WILL be a million ends to weave in, but I weave them in as I complete each square so I don’t leave them all till the end.

So! In this post we’ll show you the materials I used, and how I made the first square. In the next few posts I will share:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make stripes!

First, we need:

24‐peg loom (I got mine from this kit, it’s the smallest in the kit)

Loom pick

Bulky weight yarn or two strands of worsted held together

Stitch marker

Tea! (optional but highly recommended)

(For the demonstration I’m going to make a hand towel with some worsted weight cotton, and for clarity purpose, I’m just going to use a single strand. But for the blanket, if you’re using worsted weight, it’s best to use 2 strands held together for the gauge of this loom.)

Before knitting we need to mark the middle stitch. Counting from the first peg, which is the first peg to the right of the side knob, put the stitch marker on the 12th peg on the loom, like so…

Then we’re ready to cast on!

Cast on row: Make a slip knot with the yarn, adjust it to the first peg. E wrap (wrap the working yarn around the peg from right to left) the first peg and knit off. Cast on the next 22 pegs by e‐wrapping each peg twice and knit the bottom loop over the top loop. Beware not to cast on too tightly.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‐wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. 

(Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.)

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‐wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‐wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‐wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‐wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

And that’s it! Just repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 pegs left with loops on them. (moving the stitches is kind of tedious, apparently there are looms with moving inserts to help with this…? But I don’t have one of those looms, so this is why we only make one or two squares a day! It’s not so bad.)

Purl the last 3 loops, then move the loops to the left and right of the marked peg to the marked peg. E‐wrap and knit off the bottom 3 loops. Take the last loop off the peg, cut yarn, and tie off by bringing the yarn tail around the loop to the front, then through the loop from back to front, as pictured.

And here we have our first square! Now by always e‐wrap knitting the marked/middle peg, you’ll get a raised line of knit stitches or braid running diagonally through the square. For my blanket I just purl all the pegs on the purl rows, because I can’t trust my attention to always knit that one stitch on purl row and not make mistakes. But it’s up to you!

Here’s a sneak peek of how we will join the next square, so you can see the finished square. (and see? I already make a mistake by purling the marked stitch on a purl row!)

Happy knitting! I’ll be back in a few days with the next episode of join‐as‐you‐go mitered square blanket! :D

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

 

 

cumulus cowl

I had a vision of this cowl when I saw the yarn, which was Loops & Threads Barcelona in Arctic, and I bought it because it was on massive sale. It is a very fluffy yarn and with the colours it reminds me of clouds. I wanted to create a subtle cable texture where the cables may not be super noticeable at first glance, and the crossing of the stitches are a bit hidden, like clouds, which are easily taken for granted unless we take time to stop and notice their forms and shapes, and twists and turns.

I was happy with the way it came out so I thought I’d share what I did. The fabric is doubled so it’s extra warm and squishy. It would work nicely with any bulky yarn with long colour transitions of grey and white. (or other colours you like!)

 

It is a loom knitting pattern, and if you’re new to it now worries! I include links to video tutorials for different techniques. Loom knitting itself is quite easy, so a beginner would be able to follow this pattern.

Material:

Half a skein of Loops & Threads Barcelona — about 150 yards.

41 peg Knit Quick round loom and loom knitting hook

4 mm crochet hook (for weaving in ends)

Pattern:

Mark the pegs with elastic bands or stitch markers. Mark the first two pegs, *skip two pegs, mark the next two*, repeat from * to * around until there are 3 pegs left.

E‐wrap cast on all the pegs around the loom.

E‐wrap every round until piece is 2″ in length.

Cable round: *Take off and hold the loops from the first two marked pegs. Place the loop from first peg on the second peg, then place the loop from the second peg on the first peg, then e‐wrap the two stitches* (cable stitch complete). E‐wrap the next two stitches as usual. Repeat from * to * over the next two stitches on marked pegs to work cable stitch. Continue around working cable stitch over the stitches on marked pegs, and working regular e‐wraps over unmarked pegs. (Here’s a video for the cable stitch, except that in the video u‐wraps and purl stitches are used, whereas in this pattern only e‐wraps are used)

E‐wrap 3 rounds.

Repeat the last 4 rounds until piece is 16″ in length.

E‐wrap until the piece is 18″ in length, don’t fasten off.

Seaming:

Place the cast on loops back on the pegs, careful in matching the loops to the pegs (i.e. the first loop of the round in the first peg, second loop on the second peg, and so on). Bind off loosely, treating the bottom two loops as one. Fasten off and weave in ends.

Move the seam towards the middle of the cowl, and enjoy the fluffiness!

Happy weekend, friends! :D

 

the sharing hat

This hat was made and the pattern written while Mike and I participated at the Warming Toronto event at the end of February, which was an event in which people gather together and make hats and scarves for shelters and outreach programs in the city. So I’m sharing this pattern with these intentions:

1) The hat is quick to make. I had to restart several times while I was figuring out a pattern, and I was also eating a very delicious plate of fish and chips (AWAY from the yarn — this setup was only for Instagram!), but I made the hat from start to finish within 4 hours, so making it from the pattern should take much less time!

2) Since it’s such a quick make, I’m hoping that this will encourage you to make one for yourself and make another to pass it on to someone who can really use a thick and warm hat!

Behold the cozy yarn pile — by the time I finished the hat we’ve collected 114 finished items! :D

The event took place at a pub, which has an upstairs library with couches and fireplace, perfect for yarn‐crafting and provided backgrounds for my photo shoot that are much more interesting than what I usually have :D

The hat is worked sideways then seamed together. It has rows of braided puff stitch and texture created by crocheting into the 3rd loop on the back of a half‐double crochet stitch. If you haven’t tried neither of those stitches, don’t worry, I took plenty of process photos to show how it’s done :)

The hat measures about 9″ tall (brim folded) and 20″ around. 

Material:

Two skeins of Bernat Softee Chunky, or other super bulky weight yarn (the hat uses about 150 yards, so 3 skeins would make 2 hats! :D)

Contrasting colour yarn for pom pom.

9 mm hook, and a smaller hook for weaving in ends.

Yarn needle.

Pattern:

*Note: beginning ch does not count as a stitch throughout the pattern.

Row 1 (RS): ch 26, hdc in 3rd ch from hook, hdc in each ch to end. (24 hdc’s)

Row 2 (WS): ch 1, hdc in back loop only (BLO) in the first 6 hdc’s, then hdc in the 3rd loop in each of the remainder of the hdc’s, like so…

You would insert the hook into the strands of yarn in the direction of the arrows. This creates a nice raised braid on the right side :)

Row 3: (puff braid row) ch 3, skip first 2 hdc, dc in next hdc…

[yo and pull up a loop] three times in the first hdc of the row, then pull through all loops on hook (puff stitch made)…

*skip next hdc, dc in next hdc, puff st in the same hdc as last dc made* rep from * to * till there are 7 hdc’s left in row, dc BLO in each hdc to end.

Row 4: (puff stitch row) ch 1, dc BLO in next 7 dc, sk next st, dc in next dc (between 2 puff st’s)…

puff st in the st before the skipped st…

*skip next st, dc in next st, puff st in st before skipped st* rep from * to * till end of row. When arriving at the end of row, work last dc in the very last st…

Then end with a puff st.

Row 5: ch 1, make sure the first hdc is made in the very first st…

Then hdc in next 17 st’s, hdc BLO in last 6 st’s.

Row 6: ch 1, hdc BLO in first 6 hdc’s, hdc in the 3rd loop in the remaining 18 hdc’s.

Row 7: ch 1, hdc in first 18 hdc’s, hdc BLO in remaining 6 hdc’s.

Repeat rows 2–7 three more times, except in the last repeat, omit row 7 and end with row 6.

Decrease row at top: ch 1, 2 dc tog evenly across the top of the hat.

Cut yarn and leave a long tail for sewing. Thread yarn tail in yarn needle, weave yarn tail through the stitches at the top of hat, cinch close and tie to secure. Turn hat inside out, sew seam. Make and attach pom pom. Fold up the brim for extra warmth!

I hope you enjoy making the hat! Leave a comment if you have any questions or need clarifications. And if you’re looking for places to send your yarn‐craft items… 

Here’s a list by the Toronto Knitters Guild of places that accept yarn‐crafted goodness in Toronto.

Warm Hands Network collects and sends handmade items nationally and internationally, especially to northern locations.

For friends in the USA, the lists on Mental Floss and Red Heart may be good places to start :)

With glowing heart and busy hands — happy yarn‐crafting!

 

 

may the porg be with you

I made a tiny porg!

Fan opinions about them seem to polarize. I happen to love them like I love all fuzzy round‐shaped creatures. Its shape is so amigurumi‐ready, and it reminded me of my penguin tots. I couldn’t help but had to make one. 

If you’ve made the penguin tots before, the porg is not different structurally but a bit more complicated with the colour changes.

It’s very carry‐able and rides well in pocket, so it can always be with you :)

The upturned mouth of the actual porg makes my tiny version look sad, so I opted for a regular mouth instead. 

Here it is contemplating life, or deciding what to eat for lunch, by the jade plant.

To make your own tiny porg, you’ll need:

Small amount of mustard, white, brown and orange yarn in worsted weight

3.5 mm hook 

2.5 mm hook (for feet and weaving in ends)

2 black safety eyes (3mm), or round black beads

Black thread and sewing needle

Yarn needle

Yarn ends (for stuffing), or polyester stuffing

Pattern:

Body:

Note: beginning ch 1 does not count as a stitch throughout.

Round 1: With brown, ch 4, 2 sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next ch, 3 sc in last ch, sc in the remaining loop of the next ch (the ch that has only 1 sc in it), sc in the next ch (the ch with the beginning 2 sc in it), sl st in first sc of round.

Round 2: ch 1, 2 sc in first sc, sc in next 3 sc, 3 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc, sc in next sc (the sc with the beginning 2 sc in it), sl st in first sc of round.

In the next round we begin to incorporate other colours. Here’s a tutorial on how to change colours seamlessly, in case it’s helpful.

Round 3: ch 1, in back loop only, sc in next 7 sc. When completing the 7th sc, attach and change to white. Carrying the brown yarn (i.e. wrap it in your stitch) as you crochet with white, sc in the next 4 sc. When completing the 4th sc, change back to brown, sc in last sc, sl st in first sc.

Round 4: With brown, ch 1, sc in next 7 sc, change to white, carrying the brown as you go, sc in next 4 sc, change to brown, sc in last sc, sl st in first sc.

Round 5: Repeat round 4.

Round 6: With brown, ch 1, sc in next 6 sc. Change to yellow and carrying brown as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to white and carry the brown and yellow as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to yellow and carry the brown as you go, sc in next 2 sc, change to brown, sl st in first sc.

Round 7: Repeat around 6.

After round 7, install safety eyes (or sew on beads for eyes) in between the 2 yellow stitches between rounds 6 and 7. Sew on mouth. Stuff with yarn ends or stuffing.

Round 8: With brown, ch 1, 2 sc tog three times, change to yellow and fasten off brown, 2 sc tog with yellow, change to white and carry the yellow as you go, 2 sc tog with white, change to yellow and fasten off white, 2 sc tog with yellow, sl st in first sc of round, fasten off, leave a long tail. Weave the tail in the remaining stitches around and cinch the opening close, secure and fasten off, weave in ends.

Wings (make 2): With brown, ch 2, 5 sc in 2nd ch from hook, ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook (forming a point), sc in ch with the 5 sc in it, sl st in first sc of round, leave a tail for sewing, fasten off. (I only leave a tail for sewing on one wing, not both.

Sew on wings: Position the wing with the yarn tail for sewing on the side of the body, thread the yarn needle in the yarn tail, insert needle where you want the first wing, pull the needle through the body so the needle comes out on the other side where you want the other wing to be. Thread the other wing through the needle, and sew back and forth through the body to secure both wings at the same time. Fasten off, weave in ends.

Feet:

Feet are made linked together with a few ch in between.

With orange, *ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in very first ch made, ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sl st in very first ch made*, ch 2 (link between feet), then repeat from * to * once more. Fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing.

Position feet under body and sew on with yarn tail, fasten off and weave in ends.

The porg is ready for adventures!

Tiny porg wishes everyone an awesome week!