slow: hats

I’ve made quite a few of these hats with crochet slip stitch. I like that they’re made slowly. 

I’m going to attempt to write the pattern for 3 different yarn weights, so it’s versatile for whatever yarn you have on hand. They all make a hat that is 19″ around and 11″ in length (with brim unfolded). The stitch is quit stretchy so it will fit most I think. Here’s the worsted weight version on me.

And the worsted weight version on Mike (I have a smaller head than he does).

This is the sport weight version.

After testing the sport weight version with a leftover skein of acrylic yarn, I treated myself to a skein of merino hand-dyed by Toronto Yarn Hop co-organizer Emily Gillies. She has a range of beautiful colours, and one skein of merino sport is perfect for making one hat. 

I made the hat in blue spruce (pictured here, in first photo, and in process photos below). The wonderful custom vegan tag is by Millie Marty Co. in Belleville, ON.

The hat can also be made more quickly in bulky yarn. I tested it while attending the Warming Toronto event (an afternoon of hanging out with great folks at a local pub while making hats, scarfs and mittens for distribution at emergency shelters in the winter). And this hat took about 3.5 hours to make.

Dimension of all three versions (sport, worsted, bulky): 19″ around, 11″ in length with brim unfolded. 

Suggested yarn:

Sport — Merino Sport by Emily Gillies, 1 skein, 282 yards

Worsted — Patons Classic Wool Worsted, 2 skeins, 210 yards each

Bulky — Patons Shetland Chunky, 2 skeins, 148 yards each

Pattern:

Instructions are for sport weight (worsted and bulky in parenthesis).

The turning ch does not count as a stitch.

The hats are made with slip stitch in black loop only (BLO), made sideways with short rows for crown shaping, then seamed at the back with slip stitch (or sewing).

Crochet loosely, otherwise it can be difficult to get the hook into the slip stitches.

The hat can be made wider with one or two additional short rows, and longer with additional stitches in the beginning chain (makes for a wider brim).

Hooks: 
Sport — 5.5 mm
Worsted — 6.5 mm
Bulky — 10 mm

Row 1 (setup row): ch 55 (40, 33), sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in each ch to end.

First set of short rows:

Row 2: ch 1, sl st in each st until there is one st left, skip remaining st, turn.

Row 3: ch 1, skip first st, sl st in each st to end. 

Repeat rows 2 and 3 six (four, three) more times.

Next row: ch 1, st st in each st. At this point the piece will look like this.

Continue on and sl st into each end of the short row and the space in between each row — 14 (10, 8) stitches across the short rows, then sl st in the remaining last stitch from row 2. The piece will now look like this.

Next row*: ch 1, sl st in each st to end.

Second set of short rows:

Row 1: ch 1, sl st in each st until there are 14 (10, 8) stitches left in the row, turn.

Row 2: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Row 3: ch 1, st st in every st, then sl st in the next two st in the row marked with * (the row made before row 1 of the second set of short rows), turn.

Repeat rows 2 and 3 six (four, three) more times.

Next row: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Repeat first and second sets of short rows four more times. Don’t fasten off.

Crochet seam together right side out. Turn inside out. Weave yarn through each stitch in crown opening, cinch and tied off. Weave in ends. Turn right side out. Fold up brim.  

Happy crocheting!

 

Note: No incentive or commission was received for this post. Simply thought it was neat that I could find local artisans for both the yarn and custom tags, and want to support indie businesses :)

 

 

slow: mitts

Really enjoying working with slip stitch after making the lunar new year bamboo. I like the slower pace of working up the fabric with this stitch. And I figured it would be a dense enough stitch to make a warm pair of mittens.

I used:

Worsted weight yarn

5.5 mm hook, and a smaller hook for weaving in ends

Tapestry needle

The mitten is crocheted flat in one piece, folded in half at the thumb, and seamed together from the tip of the thumb to the cuff edge. The photos that follow will help make sense of the construction.

All sl st worked through back loop only (BLO).

Mitten measures 9″ long, 4″ across palm, 3″ across wrist, 2″ length of thumb. I have relatively small hands. The mittens can be made larger with additional ch in the beginning and beginning ch of thumb, and additional rows between rows 7 and 15 

Pattern:

Row 1: ch 23, sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in every ch to end, ch 2 (these two extra ch increase the length by 1 st). 

Row 2: sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in every st BLO (back loop only) to end.

Row 3: ch 1 (does not count as a stitch), sl st in every st to end, ch 2.

Row 4: repeat row 2.

Row 5: repeat row 3.

Row 6: repeat row 2 (25 st altogether).

Row 7–15: ch 1, sl st in ever st BLO to end.  

Row 16: ch 1, sk first st, sl st in next st and every st to end (skipping the first st decreases 1 st).

Row 17: ch 1, sl st in every st to end.

Row 18: repeat row 16.

Row 19: repeat row 17.

Row 20: repeat row 16.

Row 21: repeat row 17 (22 st altogether). 

Row 22 (thumb begins): ch 1, sl st in the first 12 st, ch 7, sl st in second ch from hook, sl st in every ch BLO, sl st in next st on the side of mitten.

Thumb row 1: ch 1, sl st in every st on thumb to end (8 st on thumb)

Thumb row 2: ch 1, sl st in every st on thumb, sl st in next st on the side of mitten.

Repeat thumb rows 1 and 2 three more times. 

Continue working 10 rows on thumb, without attaching the end of the row to the side of the mitten.

Don’t fasten off. ch 13, sl st in second ch on hook, sl st in every ch, work 5 sl st across the base of the 10 rows of them that are not attached to the body of the mitten, work 5 sl st into the remaining 5 st in the side of the mitten. It will end up looking like this with the thumb folded in half.

Repeat rows 2 to 21 of mitten. I found that it was easier to fold the thumb in half and pin it together as I worked along so I don’t get confused about which direction I was going.

Fasten off. 

Cuff: Attach yarn to edge of cuff (directly opposite of where last row ended), ch 11, sc in second ch from hook to end of ch, sl st in next stitch in the mitten that looks like a “v”, sl st in next st that looks like a “v”, sc BLO in every sc to end. The mitten here is pictured upside down with the first cuff row started. 

Continue across the edge of the cuff. Here is a close up of the hook pointing at the middle of the stitch that looks like a “v”.

Attach yarn at the top of thumb. Weave yarn through all the stitches in top of thumb, cinch and tie off. Continue seaming down the thumb and around the mitten to edge of cuff. Fasten off and weave in ends. 

The mittens are actually fairly quick to work up. If you’re in/near Toronto, consider joining us in the annual Warming Toronto event on Sunday, February 9. We spend an afternoon at at a pub downtown, knit, crochet, loom, have a pint, share snacks, chatter, and make hats, mitts, scarfs, cowls, etc. for distribution at emergency shelters over the winter months. If one mitten is finished at home first, one can definitely finish the pair while hanging out for a few hours at the event.  

Stay warm! ❄

renew

Today is the first day of Chinese new year. I made this bamboo as a gift. Pretty happy with how it turned out.

I thought bamboo generally symbolizes good luck because it’s sold in every Chinese shop that sells plants. But with a quick search on the internet I learned that it also represents renewal (because of how quickly it grows), flexibility/strength, and longevity — so, resilience, tenaciousness.

Tenacious” is a word that I’d like to be described by. I don’t give up, or perhaps more truthfully I find it hard giving up on things or people. Some would say that I’m not very good at letting go. Other have said I’m stubborn. I’d like to think that I’m tenacious. But I guess a way forward would be to cultivate flexibility, to renew or reorient my approach to how I’m tenaciously connecting to some things.

Anyway, I’d also say that the crochet slip stitch is a very bamboo-like stitch, because it makes a firm fabric and therefore tenacious, it is however also very flexible and stretchable, almost like a knitted rib.

Here I’d like to share a loosely formed recipe for making the bamboo. It’s kind of like free-formed crocheting, and how tall the plant is depends on the vase you’re using, but there are some basics to it, in case anyone would like to give it a try.

I used:

Caron Simply Soft for the bamboo stalk because of its sheen

Patons Astra for the yellow rings and caps

Bernat Super Value for the leaves

5.5 mm hook for the stalk

3.5 mm hook for the rings and caps

Tapestry needle

Popsicle sticks

Vase with pebbles

Stalks are made with back loop slip stitch (tutorial).
With larger hook and lighter green, make a chain of desired length. I started with 25 ch for the tallest, and 21 and 15 for the other two. Then sl st BLO until piece is about 1.5″ wide. Without fastening off, sl st to join the seams together lengthwise, making a long tube (the sl st seam will be on the outside; the piece won’t be turned inside out after seaming). Fasten off.

Rings are made around the stalks with surface slip stitch (tutorial).
With smaller hook and yellow, attach yarn where you want the ring to be at the back seam of the stalk. sl st in every stitch in the rows crosswise (not just the stitch that appears as a “v”, but also the stitch in between the “v“s, so that the rings would protrude a bit). Fasten off after every ring made and pull the tails inside the stalk.

Caps are made with magic ring (tutorial) with 8 sc inside the ring, sl st to join with first sc, then fasten off and leave a long tail for sewing. Attach ring to the top of the stalk.

Leaves may be a little tricky to explain… I regret not taking progress photos, very sorry. It took quite a bit of experimentation but I settled on this method and I think the results are quite lively looking. I hope this makes sense.

With smaller hook and darker green, ch 5 to 7 (this is the stem you’re sewing to the stalk, so its length depends on how you want to position the sprig of leaves on the bamboo), dc in second ch from hook, *[ch 1, dc in ch just made] two or three times (depending on how long you want the leaf to be), ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st evenly into the dc’s made earlier (roughly 2 sl st per dc), sl st into the last ch of the stem*. At this point you can sl st down every ch of the stem then fasten off with tail for sewing, or you can make another leave by sl st down just a couple of ch on the stem, then repeat * to *, and sl st down every ch of the stem, fasten off and leave a tail for sewing.

Sew the leaves to the stalks as desired.

Assembly:

The bamboo stalks are supported by popsicle sticks on the inside. I used popsicle sticks because it’s the only thing I can find to use at home. The width of it and the thickness of the crochet fabric takes up the interior of the stalks so they don’t need more stuffing. I’ve had to connect a couple of popsicle sticks together for the taller two stalks by simply overlapping the ends of the sticks and gluing them together with white glue (hot glue would be a better choice).

To determine the lengths of popsicle sticks you need, measure how deeply you want the sticks to extend toward the base of the vase. I would want the sticks to actually touch the base of the vase to make sure the sticks don’t wobble too easily. Determine the length of stick that is sticking out of the end of the stalk. It would be the same for all the stalks. Then measure how tall each stick will need to be according to the length of the stalk.

Pour a layer of pebbles into the vase. I think smaller stone chips at least for the bottom layer are better for stability. Insert the stalks and arrange as desired, then pour on more pebbles. I used different glass ones on top for interest.

I later added a red ribbon around the stalk for gift-giving that is not pictured because it blocked the bamboo too much. But that also helps with the stability.

I didn’t have any other new year decorations but thankfully there are emojis 😊🎋

Wishing everyone good health and happiness in the year of the 🐀

settling in…

I don’t think I’ve ever been away for so long, I’m so sorry folks! >_<

April was a very challenging month. There was a great loss in my family, there were final papers for the school term, and we were moving to a new place. The month felt like a blur, but at the same time each day felt excruciatingly long, with too many thoughts and too many feelings. So have been spending the month of May trying to settle in and feeling the earth beneath my feet again.

But I thought I’d bring a new thing when I return here. A how-to for a floor pouf!

The pouf is finger-knitted and uses exactly two skeins of Bernat Blanket yarn. It uses the same techniques of four finger knitting and turning as the ear warmers, and the photo tutorial is here.

The pouf is about 2 feet in diameter and 1.5 feet tall. I stuffed it with an old double size duvet. I do have to fluff it up after sitting on it, so for a firmer pouf it can probably be stuffed a bit more with a queen size duvet or another blanket.

To make the floor pouf, cast on the first row and knit until piece is about 25″ long, then turn and knit until you have just enough yarn left to sew up the seam (about 50″ of yarn tail). The piece would be about 45″ wide.

Sew the short edges of the rectangle together using tapestry needle, tie off, then turn right side out. Weave the yarn tail through the stitches around one opening edge, then cinch tightly and sew shut. Fasten off.

Stuff with duvet. Using a different colour yarn (I used a length of worsted weight yarn doubled up) that’s about 50″ long, weave through the stitches around the other opening edge, cinch and tie with a removable knot. So that the duvet can be taken out for washing.

This is the first piece of knitted furniture I’ve made so I’m quite proud :)

Hope to write again soon. Until then, take good care!

tchotchke the cat pillow

I bought some very chunky, very fluffy wool in Cape Breton a few years ago. It knits up in variegated stripes and I thought it would make a wonderful cat pillow. And the yarn weight is great for the large gauge of loom knitting.

I named the cat Tchotchke, because I like the sound of the word :D and because I have a lot of cat tchotchkes.

It’s basically a tube shape without any shaping, it’s the sewing together that makes the feet nubby feet and the ears. It’s a very beginner-friendly project :)

Regular knitting: Alternatively, if one isn’t into loom knitting, I imagine that this cat pillow can also easily be made with a 10 mm circular needle and super chunky yarn. Just cast on 41 stitches, then knit one round and purl one round (garter stitch) until it’s 14 inches in length, then proceed with the sewing instructions. (I haven’t tried it though, so I don’t know if it might knit up smaller using regular needles, and one would therefore make the cat shorter.)

I used:

41-peg loom, from this Loops & Threads set

12-peg loom (optional, just easier when making the tail)

Loom knitting pick

Super chunky weight yarn about 200 m / 150 g (I suggest using the chunkiest fluffiest yarn you can find so less stuffing show through)

Polyester stuffing

Tapestry needle

Black yarn (I used worsted weight doubled up)

Body:

With drawstring cast-on (instruction video here), cast on all the pegs of the 41-peg loom using the super chunky yarn.

Knit one row (knit stitch instruction video here, ignore the cast-on part in the beginning).

Purl one row (purl stitch instruction video here, again ignore the cast-on part).

Repeat the previous two rows (thus working the garter stitch) until the piece is about 14 inches in length.

Bind off (bind off instruction video here).

Tail:

Cast on 7 pegs on the smaller loom or the same loom.

Knit one row and purl one row. Repeat these two rows until the piece is 12 inches long.

Leaving a very long yarn tail, weave the tail through the stitches on the pegs, then remove the stitches from the pegs and cinch to gather the stitches. Fold the tail in half length-wise and sew together using mattress stitch. Stop sewing and tie off 2 inches away from the end.

New we sew it together and make a cat shape!

With the drawstring cast-on on the body, pull on the yarn tail and cinch it close, but not too tightly. It will form a sort of curve. Tie off, then sew the opening close by sewing through both layers of fabric using whip stitch. (picture below)

With the other end of the tube (the ears and head), using whip stitch again, and sewing both layers of fabric together, sew from the edge in about 2 inches toward the centre. Repeat from the other edge. It will leave an opening in the centre of the head.

Stuff with stuffing, but not too firmly.

Weave a piece of yarn around each stitch in the centre opening, cinch it tightly closed, and tie off securely. (picture below shows what the top of the head looks like after it’s all sewn together.)

With the tail, spread open the end of the tail and sew around its edges while attaching it to the body using whip stitch. It will look like this:

Finally, sew on eyes, nose/mouth and whiskers with the black yarn.

A new friend to watch TV and hang out with! :D

Have a good week everyone!

fab kimono

A quick kimono style cardigan/shrug I pulled together to wear to my cousin’s wedding this weekend :) Can’t come up with a more poetic name, but thought it looks pretty fab (if I do say so myself), so fab kimono it is :D

I had quite a bit of leftover Red Heart Unforgettable after making a scarf as a gift, so I bought another skein to make this. It’s cropped length because I was going to wear this long black dress and wanted some contrasts in style. But it’s easy to make longer if you’d like.

It’s crocheted from side to side, making both front and back pieces at the same time (so there’s no seaming in the middle!). It is then folded in half with just 2 short sides to seam at the end.

With autumn in the air I think this is a good layering piece for wearing with summer dress, t‑shirt, long sleeve shirt, or even buttoned up collared shirt.

Size: 

Length (shoulder to lower edge) — 17″

Around — 60″

Gauge:

16 st = 4.5″

I used:

3 skeins of Red Heart Unforgettable in Dragonfly

6.5 mm hook

Tapestry needle

Smaller hook to weave in ends with

Pattern:

Left front/back:

Row 1: fdc 126 (see instruction for foundation double crochet or fdc here)

To increase length, add 16 fdc for every 4.5″.

Row 2: ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), dc in next 5 dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc, *dc in next 6 dc, ch 2, sk 2 dc* repeat from * to * to end, dc in last 6 dc. 

Repeat row 2 until piece measures 15″ (approx. 26 rows).

Next row: dc in every dc and 2 dc in every 2 ch sp. 

Split right front:

Next row: ch 3, dc in next 62 dc, fdc 63 and leave the remaining dc from previous row unworked.

Repeat row 2 of left front/back until piece measures 15″ from split. 

Last row: dc in every dc and 2 dc in every 2 ch sp. Fasten off.

Assembly:

Fold piece in half so that the split is perpendicular to the fold line. The fold line will be the shoulders. 

Sew side seam together by attaching yarn at the lower edge, matching stitches on front and back pieces, sew together the next 30 dc. Fasten off. Repeat on the other side seam. Weave in ends.

Wear and be fabulous!

 

8‑bit

So earlier in the summer I started writing a number of crochet patterns that I was hoping to compile into an e‑book for sale. But the summer is quickly going by, and I’ve had more freelance work than expected (which is a good thing). So then I realize I don’t realistically have the capacity to pattern-test, calculate for different sizes, etc. in order to make the patterns sell-able. So! I’m just going to continue in this blog’s tradition in sharing patterns for free! :D It’s just that it will require some creative/math work if you’re not making the exact same size I’m wearing. But that also means lots of rooms for customization! This is the first of the few patterns I was working on :)

I’ve always wanted to try using corner-to-corner (c2c) crochet to make a top. My first idea was a cozy sweater with a dinosaur on it (I might still do that, we’ll see!), but all these heat waves we’ve been having are not conducive to cozy sweater-making, so I thought I’d try with a lace weight yarn for a breezy summer top. 

The “tiles” made in c2c crochet reminds me of colourful pixels, and Nintendo video games of my childhood, and summer vacation spent playing these games. So I called it “8‑bit”.

It can be worn both ways, either with the buttons on the front, or on the back!

Buttons in the front makes it a cardigan, which can be paired with a spaghetti strap summer dress!

The top is made in 4 pieces then sewn together. So you can also sew the v‑neck pieces together and place the buttons on the round-neck side.

There is also some shoulder shaping so that the cap sleeves will follow the shoulders rather than stick out. I thought that goes better with the gentle, delicate feel of the lace weight Noro Taiyo.

Size: Bust 36″, armhole depth 7″, neck opening width 8″, total length 17″

Size is easy to adjust as you go with the c2c crochet stitch. There will be tips for adjustment throughout in italics.

Gauge: 5x5 “tiles” = 2“x2”

Material: 

3.5 mm hook, and the smallest hook you have for weaving in ends (mine is 1.5 mm)

Lace weight yarn about 1100 yards (I only used a bit of the second skein of Noro Taiyo Lace, one skein of this is over 900 yards), larger sizes will require more yarn

Seven 1/2″ buttons

Sewing needle

Corner-to-corner crochet: this pattern requires familiarity with c2c crochet. If you’ve never used this stitch before, no worries! It’s quite easy and I find it rather meditative too. There are tons of very detailed tutorials out there. I learned from the photo tutorial by One Dog Woof, take a look and use some scrap yarn to practice, and I’m sure you’ll be ready in no time!

Charts:

 

 

Pattern/recipe:

V‑neck piece (make 2):

Start from the lower left corner, tile 1. Continue through chart. Chart is read diagonally. Follow this excellent photo tutorial by One Dog Woof if you need some help!

When there are 22 tiles on both edges, begin decreasing on the right edge by working 1 sl st through each dc just made, and sl st in turning ch, then ch 3, 3 dc in turning ch, and continuing on.

For a larger garment, continue working more tiles until desired width before decreasing. To determine “desired width”, decide on finished bust measurement you’d like for the top. Say 40″. Divide it by 4, which is 10″. Then continue c2c crochet until both edges are 10″ long before decreasing on the right edge. Note the number of tiles you have at the bottom edge when you reach desired width. You will need to have the same number of tiles on the bottom edge of each of the pieces.

Continue increasing on the left edge but decreasing on the right edge until the left edge has 37 tiles. 

For a longer garment, continue increasing on the left edge until desired length. Note the number of tiles when you reach desired length.

Shape shoulder:

Begin decreasing on the left edge after the 37th tile (or desired length). Work one row towards the right edge, then one row towards the left edge. After crocheting the last tile on the top edge, work another tile on top of the previous row (I placed an additional white tile on top of the brown tile of the previous row).

Then, as usual, turn, sl st in next 3 dc, sl st in turning ch.

And continue down the row.

Repeat the above steps for shoulder shaping until shoulder resembles the chart. 

(We’re of course not going to leave the shoulders jagged! We’ll fill in the corners as we sew them together later.)

Then, decrease on both the top edge and the right edge until there are 9 tiles at top edge. End with working loop on the top edge, don’t fasten off.

If you have increased in the bottom edge, increase the same number of tiles at the top edge.

Neck edge:

*Work 3 dc in the corner between first two tiles (where the lower left corner of the tile the working loop is on meets the top right of the next tile), sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row (the neck edge is shown in the next photo). Fasten off.

Round-neck piece (make 2):

Follow pattern/recipe until neck edge. (making the same increases if you’ve made them in the v‑neck pieces.)

*Work 3 dc in the corner between first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * 3 more times, ch 3, 3 dc in turning ch.

Continue in c2c stitch pattern, decreasing on both edges until there final tile is made, fasten off.

Sew halves together:

Sew together the centre seams of the two round-neck pieces.

Seaming shoulders:

With wrong side facing, attach yarn to lower edge of shoulder on one piece.

*Work 3 dc in corner between the first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row, don’t fasten off.

With right sides together, place shoulder of v‑neck piece to the shoulder of the round-neck piece just completed, matching both pieces. With working loop still attached to the round-neck piece, sl st in top of shoulder of v‑neck piece.

*Work 3 dc in corner between the first two tiles, sl st in next turning ch* repeat from * to * until end of row, leave a long tail for sewing, fasten off. 

Sew entire shoulders together (the slopes we just worked on and the top edges). Repeat on the other shoulder.

The rest of assembly:

With wrong sides facing, sew side seams together. For my top I counted 17 tiles down from shoulder for 7″ in armhole depth, then started sewing to the bottom edge. If making a deeper armhole, measure the desired depth and count the number of tiles within the measurement.

Buttons:

Sew buttons on one edge where the turning ch on the edge will form natural button holes, which is every 4th tile.

Weave in all the ends with a tiny hook, and we’re done! :D

Leave a comment if you have any questions or need clarifications! Happy crocheting!

 

loom-knit-along: join-as-you-go mitered square blanket – part 5

Now that we’ve gotten the hang of making mitered square, you might get a bit bored of making solid colour squares. You can make striped ones! And use up smaller balls of scraps! Here’s what I do…

After casting on, purling one row, decreasing one stitch on either side of the centre peg, and moving each stitch over, introduce the new colour by making a slip knot with the new yarn and placing it on the peg with the first stitch of the row.

Knit over the old yarn (pink), then continue e‑wrapping with the new yarn (blue). Purl one row with the new yarn. Then switch back to the pink yarn.

Lay the working yarn of the previous row on top of the new yarn before making the first e‑wrap to carry the yarn with you as you go. (in this case we’re bringing back the pink yarn and about to make an e‑wrap on the first peg, notice the blue yarn is on top of the pink so it gets wrapped into the stitch.)

When you have 5 stitches left after a purl row, cut the current yarn, and tie off.

Do the decrease around the centre peg and move the stitches over as usual, and complete the square.

Here’s the stripy square!

You can also make scrappy squares that use up every last bits of yarn. I knit till I have about 2 inches left, and tie on a new yarn very close to the peg (I learned this from watching videos of loom knitting plush toys by the Loom Muse — more on that in another post!)

In the photo below the new yarn is the grey one and the one that ran out is green.

The resulting scrappy square looks like this :)

Yes, lots of ends to weave in on these squares but I like the look of them :)

I hope you’ve enjoyed this series of how-to for making a mitered square blanket! Happy knitting!

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

 

loom-knit-along: join-as-you-go mitered square blanket – part 4

Hello! We’re back with the last step in loom knitting the mitered square blanket, which is to join all the other squares in the blanket after the first row and after the first square of any row. This is how the majority of the squares will be joined!

As always, we orient the loom to the blanket (or in the case of this demonstration, a dish cloth). The square we joined in the last post is the blue square.

The loops marked with the blue dots on the blue square will go on the pegs parked with the blue dots, and the loops marked with the red dots on the yellow square will go on the pegs with the red dots. 

We would begin with placing the loops on the yellow square on the pegs, starting from the edge towards the centre, and starting the first peg that is right beside the side knob. We place the last loop on the yellow square on the peg before the marked centre peg, then place the first loop of the blue square on the marked peg, and the rest of the loops of the blue square onto the pegs until the second last peg of the loom — 23 stitches altogether. 

Here’s a closer look at the loops that are placed on the pegs. Note that the loops that are picked up are the horizontal strands in between purl bumps.

And here’s how it looks on the loom when both yellow and blue squares are attached, with the right side of the square touching the inside of the loom.

When you’re actually knitting with the blanket on your lap, it would be oriented like this. I would start putting on the loops from the black/grey/beige square, which is the square from the previous row, and then put on the loops from the purple/mixed colour square, which is the square made just before the current one.

Now we’re ready to knit the new square as we usually do. We start with adjusting a slip knot on the first peg (the one right beside the side knob), knit off the loop below, then e‑wrap and knit off each stitch.

Instruction for the rest of the square is pasted below, but if you need more help there are photos in the first post.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‑wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. (Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.) 

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‑wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‑wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‑wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‑wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 stitches left. Purl the 3 stitches. Place the stitch on the left and stitch on the right onto the middle peg, e‑wrap, then knit off all 3 bottom loops. Fasten off.

Here’s how my mitered square dish cloth looks like! :D I crocheted a border and loop at the top with a 6.5mm hook, basically 1 single crochet in each stitch around, and 3 sc in each corner.

Next time we’ll have our last post of the series on how to make striped squares, or essentially how I change colours to use up every last bit of those scraps.

You might ask, isn’t there a million ends to weave in at the end? Yes, so I don’t wait till the end. Usually I weave in the ends after making one or two squares. Leaving ALL the ends to weave in after 10x15 squares would drive me mad :S (I plan on making the blanket 10 squares wide and 15 squares tall)

Till next time, happy knitting! 

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares

loom-knit-along: join-as-you-go mitered square blanket – part 3

Hello friends! We’re back again with our mitered square blanket! Today we’re going to join the first square on the second row, and the method for joining is the same for the first square in every row. 

Let’s first orient ourselves. For the first square in every row, we will always be joining under the first square in the previous row. In our case, it’s the purple square (in the last post we joined the yellow square). 

We will place the loops on the bottom edge of the purple square (as indicated by the red dots) onto the pegs on the loom that are marked by the red dot, starting at the first peg (the one that’s beside the side knob) and ending at the peg marked with a stitch marker, or the one just before it. So you will put on 11 or 12 loops, it doesn’t make a difference.

To place the loops on the square onto the pegs, find the horizontal strands between the purl bumps, and place the strands onto the pegs.

When actually joining/knitting the square, you would position it like this, with the right side of the square you’re joining to facing the inside of the loop, and picking up the loops on the side this way. (And yes that was a wonderful day knitting in the sun sitting on the grass in a park! :D)

Once the loops are placed onto the peg, make a slip knot with the new yarn (in this demonstration it’s the blue yarn), place it on the first peg, and knit over with the loop on the peg.

E‑wrap the next peg, then knit over. Repeat until there are no loops on the next pegs. Then, e‑wrap the next loop twice and knit off the bottom loop (in this demonstration it is the marked peg, but it can also be the peg after the marked peg if you have placed a loop from the previous square on the marked peg, it doesn’t really make a difference), thereby casting on a stitch.

Continue casting on until the second last peg on the loom — that will be the last stitch, 23 stitches altogether.

You’re now ready to continue making the square as usual. Instructions are pasted below for convenience’s sake but if you need more help there are photos in the first post.

Row 1: Purl (here’s a video of purling) to the marked peg, e‑wrap knit the marked peg, purl to end. (Note in the picture that the last peg of the loom is empty — we only use 23 pegs of the loom.) Beware not to make the stitches too tight.

Row 2: Move the loop on the peg to the left of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the marked peg onto the marked peg. Now the marked peg has 3 loops on it. (Always move the loop on the left first, then the one on the right, so it looks consistent.) 

Move the loop on the peg to the left of the now empty peg onto the empty peg. Keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the right until you reach the beginning of the row.

E‑wrap and knit off each peg until you reach the marked peg. E‑wrap the marked peg, knit off all three bottom loops on the peg (I prefer knitting them off one at a time, it’s easier).

You will now have an empty peg to the right of the marked peg. Move the loop on the peg to the right of the empty peg onto the empty peg, e‑wrap the peg and knit off. Then keep moving each loop to the empty peg to the left and e‑wrap and knit off until you reach the end of row. I find it easier to do this with the loom sitting flat on a surface.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you have 3 stitches left. Purl the 3 stitches. Place the stitch on the left and stitch on the right onto the middle peg, e‑wrap, then knit off all 3 bottom loops. Fasten off.

Now we have the first square of the row joined! Next time we’ll join the next square, which is how we make the majority of the squares in the blanket.

Be sure to leave a comment on the post if you have any question! You can send me an email too but other readers may also find your questions helpful so don’t be shy :)

Happy weekend!

 

Posts in this series:

How to make the first square

How to join the subsequent squares in the first row

How to join the first square in every row

How to join all the other squares

How to make striped squares