this week’s awesome finds

Time to start the Christmas elfing (i.e. gift-making)! :D

With the bulky yarn and large needles there’s a good chance that it can be done by Christmas. Moss stitch is my favourite, and it has pockets. Pattern by Two of Wands.

 

Very practical and very cute. From Think Make Share.

 

Very sweet crochet cable bracelets, great alternative to leather ones. From Let’s Yarnify! (scroll down for English!)

 

For those who have everything — who wouldn’t need more spare pairs of socks? From Handmade Charlotte. (If you’re looking for dessert after those sushi, check out my cupcake socks tutorial! :D)

 

Also a quick knit and very stylish. From Mollie Makes.

 

And finally, not a gift that I would have the skills to make but heartwarming nonetheless — daikon animals in soup! :D

I love this daikon llama. Hope it brings a smile to your face :)

Have a lovely weekend, everyone!

 

ode to drumheller: albertosaurus!

*Drum roll* the final dinosaur to be unearthed is Alberto the albertosaurus! 

This calls for a dinosaur dance :D

The name Albertosaurus honours Alberta, the Canadian province in which the first fossils of this dinosaur was found the same year that the province was established, in 1905! (source) This whole series of mystery tiny dinosaurs is also inspired by our trip to Drumheller, Alberta, so I thought it’d be fitting to wrap up the series with the Albertosaurus.

I made them with bulky yarn and 4 mm hook. I have this variegated yarn that I thought would be perfect, and then thought it would also look rad in bright pink :D

While the Albertosaurus looks very much like Tyrannosaurus Rex, it is about half the size of T-Rex. Nevertheless, it was a fearsome dinosaur that hunted in packs. (source)

Unlike other dinosaurs in the series, which have the same features on both sides, Alberto is a one-sided dinosaur, because of the way the legs are made, so it won’t look quite right on the back side, but it would make a nice brooch or ornament.

The design is based on the Albertosaurus on the back of the ticket for Tyrrell Museum :D

This dinosaur is probably the most complicated of all in the series because of the legs. But there are lots of process photos so I hope that helps! If you need any clarifications please feel free to leave a comment!

You’ll need:

  • Small amount of Bulky weight yarn
  • 4 mm hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Black seed bead, black sewing thread and sewing needle

(You can also use worsted weight yarn and 3.5 mm hook for a smaller dinosaur)

Pattern:

The body begins as a circle.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc around).

Round 3: [2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc] five times, 2 sc in next sc, sl st in next sc (17 sc and 1 sl st around).

Head/neck:

ch 7, [yo twice, pull up a loop] three times in 4th ch from hook, yo and pull through 4 loops on hook, yo and pull through the rest of the loops on hook (4 tr tog completed), ch 1, 4 sc around last tr made, it will look like this…

sl st in next ch in neck, sc in next ch, hdc in next ch, hold body in half, sk next sc in body, sl st in next 6 sc in body/back of the dinosaur through both loops and both layers of the body piece, don’t fasten off and continue on to tail.

Tail: ch 8, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next 2 ch, sc in next 2 ch, hdc in next ch, dc in next ch, sl st in a stitch at the tip of the folded body piece, like so…

Don’t fasten off, continue on to make legs.

Front leg:

Holding the dinosaur belly side up, insert hook into a stitch in round 2 of body, next to where the last sl st was made, and bring the hook out 2 stitches from where the hook was inserted in round 2 of body, like so…

yo and pull through loop on hook. It will look like this.

yo and pull through loop on hook again, so it looks like this…

See there’s a long vertical strand of yarn made, essentially a very elongated sc. Work 2 dc tog around this vertical strand, like so…

This makes the thigh! :D

ch 6, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, pull up a loop in next 2 ch, then pull the last loop on hook through the other 2 loops on hook, sl st in next 2 ch, ch 1, don’t fasten off and continue on to back leg.

Back leg:

Insert hook from the bottom (a stitch in round 1) of body to a stitch in round 2 of body in the back, like so…

yo and pull through loop on hook. There will be a vertical strand of yarn made like the one in front leg. sl st around the vertical strand in back, then continue to make the leg with the front facing you. It will look like this from the front.

ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, pull up a loop in next 2 ch, pull last loop on hook through the other 2 loops on hook, sl st in next ch, sl st in the vertical strand…

ch 1, pull out a 20″ length of yarn, cut yarn.

Arms:

Thread yarn tail in tapestry needle, insert needle in the underside of body, and out in the front of body where the arm would be, like so…

Remove the needle. From the front of the body, insert hook where the yarn tail came out and draw up a loop. It will look like this.

ch 4, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next ch, sl st in next ch, remove hook and pull out the yarn tail.

Using the hook, pull the yarn tail to the back of body where the other yarn would be, insert hook where the yarn tail came out, draw up a loop, like so…

ch 4, sl st in 2nd ch, pull up a loop in next 2 ch, pull last loop on hook through the 2 other loops on hook, remove hook and pull out yarn tail.

Thread yarn tail through tapestry needle, insert needle at the beginning of the back arm and come out through a stitch at the top in the back, fasten off, weave in end. Sew on eye. Rawr.

I hope you enjoyed this series! Don’t forget to share your dino pics by:

 

  • Bloggers: leaving a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagrammers: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Ravellers: joining the Ravelry group and posting your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

There will be a virtual dino party with all your pictures in the near future, stay tuned! :D

 

You can find all the other mystery dino CAL posts here:

Mystery dino CAL intro post

Stu the Stegosaurus

Dmitri the Dimetrodon

Trixie the Triceratops

Bronwyn the Brontosaurus

Nessie the Plesiosaurus

Kintaro the Pterosaur

 

Have a rawring week, everyone! :D

 

 

mystery dino CAL: pterosaur!

Can’t believe we’re at the second last episode of mystery dino CAL already! This week’s dinosaur is Kintaro the pterosaur!

Pterosaur is technically a flying reptile and not a dinosaur, but that doesn’t make it any less iconic in our collective imagination of the prehistoric world! The word pterosaur literally means “winged-lizard”, the largest of this species had a wingspan as wide as a small plane. It is believed that they could fly as soon as they are hatched, and ate small fish and could filter small fish from water with teeth like those of whales. (source)

Kintaro, on the other hand, means “golden boy” in Japanese, and is a hero of extraordinary strengths and friends of animals in Japanese folklore :) (source)

The construction for Kintaro is a bit more complicated than other dinosaurs because of the wings, it’s a good next step in level of crochet challenge if you have been crocheting along! If you are new to the series, this is still not too difficult and there are some photos to guide you along, and you can find all the other dinosaurs here.

You’ll need:

  • A bit of worsted weight yarn
  • 3.5 mm hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Black thread, sewing needle, and seed beads for eyes

Pattern:

The body begins as a circle.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc around).

Round 3: [2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc] five times, 2 sc in next sc, sl st in next sc (17 sc and 1 sl st around).

Neck and head:

ch 6, sl st in 2nd ch, [yo, pull up a loop] twice in next ch, [yo, pull up a loop] twice in next ch, pull through all loops on hook (head made), ch 6, sl st in 2nd ch from hook and next 3 ch, hdc in the same ch as second half of the head (skull crest made), sc in next 2 ch of neck, continue on to wings…

Wings, tail and leg:

The rows of the wings run perpendicular to the body.

With body piece folded in half, sl st in first 2 sc of back after the neck through both layers of body. 

Then, ch 7, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 5 ch, skip next sc in body, working in the front loops of the front layer of body only, sl st in next 2 sc in body, turn.

sc in next 4 sc of wing, sl st in next sc, turn.

Skip first sc, sl st in next sc, sc in next 3 sc, sl st in next sc in body through front loops only, pull up a very long loop of yarn — I used 1.5 of a human wingspan’s length — and cut yarn.

Using tapestry needle and the long yarn tail, sew together the back towards the neck, through the remaining back loops of the front piece of body, and the back loops of the back piece of body, like so…

Remove the needle and using the long yarn tail, pull up a loop in the stitch to the right of the second sl st on body after the neck, like so…

Repeat pattern for wing.

sl st through both loops and both layers of body in next sc in body after the second wing, sl st in the last sc in body, ch 2, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in the last sc in body (tail made), sl st in a stitch between the 2nd and 3rd round of body towards the underside of the body, ch 4, fasten off (one leg made).

Other leg:

Attach yarn to back of the body in the stitch between the 2nd and 3rd round, same as where the first leg is attached. ch 4, fasten off.

Weave in ends. Trim the yarn tails on the end of the legs and fray them a bit so they look like claws. Sew on eyes. And it’s done!

Here’s Kintaro flying over Mike’s head reminding him to work hard ^_^; 

 

To recap, here are the mystery dino CAL posts so far:

Mystery dino CAL intro post

Stu the Stegosaurus

Dmitri the Dimetrodon

Trixie the Triceratops

Bronwyn the Brontosaurus

Nessie the Plesiosaurus

 

Share your dinosaur pics by:

  • Bloggers: leaving a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagrammers: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Ravellers: joining the Ravelry group and posting your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

 

Stay tuned for the grand finale of the mystery dino CAL! :D Happy weekend everyone!

 

mystery dino CAL: plesiosaurus!

 

The 5th dinosaur is Nessie the Plesiosaurus!

The name plesiosaurus derives from Greek words for “almost-lizard”. Contrary to popular imagination, plesiosaurus were not great swimmers and could not breathe underwater. It also laid eggs and buried them in soft sand like sea turtles. It measured twice as long as a horse, and weighted twice as much as a pig. (source)

Here are two Nessies bobbing along in the ocean. The larger blue version is made with bulky weight yarn and 4 mm hook, and the pale green version is made with the usual worsted weight yarn and 3.5 mm hook.

As you may notice, plesiosaurus is crocheted mostly the same as brontosaurus, but with flippers. I took some process pictures to show you how I got the flippers on :D

I used:

  • Small amount of worsted weight yarn
  • 3.5 mm hook
  • 2.5 mm hook (optional, but it’s easier for weaving in ends)
  • Sewing needle, black thread and seed beads for eyes

Pattern:

Make body, neck and tail the same as brontosaurus, as follows.

The body begins as a circle.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc).

Round 3: [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] six times (18 sc).

Round 4: sc in next 17 sc, sl st in next sc, don’t fasten off.

Neck & head: ch 8, [yo, pull up a loop] twice in the 3rd ch from hook, pull through all loops on hook, ch 1 (popcorn stitch made), 2 sc in the same ch as popcorn stitch, 1 sc in each ch down the neck, continue on to back of the dinosaur…

Back: Fold body in half, skip the sc immediately next to the neck ch (on both sides), sl st in next sc and each sc through both layers of body across back, continue on to tail…

Tail: sl st in last st through both layers on back, ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sc in last 2 ch of tail, sl st in a space between the 3rd and 4th round in the body (belly part of the dinosaur). Fasten off.

Flippers:

ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sc and hdc in next ch, sc in next ch, sl st in next ch, pull yarn through loop, leaving a tail 18″-20″ long, cut yarn. It will look like this.

With right side facing, insert hook from the back of the dinosaur into a stitch where you want to position the first set of flippers, between the 2nd and 3rd rounds of body, like so…

Then, pull the yarn tail of the flipper just made through the body, like so…

With the wrong side of the dinosaur facing and the dinosaur positioned upside down, insert hook through the body again in the same stitch, then pull up a loop using the yarn tail, like so…

Then, ch 5, and continue with stitches for the other flipper.

After the last sl st made in flipper, pull out yarn tail, and weave it into the body through the same stitch where the flippers are attached.

Repeat as the start of the other flippers.

With right side facing and the dinosaur right side up, insert hook from the back in a stitch between rounds 2 and 3 of body, where you want to position the other set of flippers, like so…

Repeat as the other set of flippers.

Sew on eyes, and we’re done! :)

 

To recap, here are the mystery dino CAL posts so far:

Mystery dino CAL intro post

Stu the Stegosaurus

Dmitri the Dimetrodon

Trixie the Triceratops

Bronwyn the Brontosaurus

 

Make a splash with your dinosaur pics by:

  • Leaving a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagram: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Joining the Ravelry group
  • Posting your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

 

Hope everyone is having a great weekend! :D

 

mystery dino CAL: brontosaurus!

Meet Bronwyn the brontosaurus!

Brontosaurus means thunder lizard! And this crocheted dino is named Bronwyn after the girl with mighty strength and the kindest heart in Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children :)

Here the Brontosaurus are enjoying a peaceful moment sharing a snack of ferns. 

It was one of the largest creatures ever walked on earth, yet lived entirely on plants. In defense, its tail could produce a sound louder than the firing of a cannon when it was cracked like a bullwhip! (source)

But I picture brontosaurus living peacefully among trees, eating plants most of the time.

Because of the way the yarn twists in crochet stitches, the neck of the dinosaur tends to twist and not stay flat. I would suggest using a stiff-feeling heavy worsted (like acrylic) or even bulky weight yarn to help maintain its shape.

To make your own peaceful dinosaur friend, you will need:

  • A bit of worsted weight yarn in main colour
  • A length of worsted weight yarn in contrasting colour, for the spots
  • 3.5 mm hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Black seed beads, for eyes
  • Sewing needle and black thread

Pattern:

By now, you probably notice that all the mystery dino patterns follow the same dumpling base, with slight modifications for the prominent features of the different dinosaurs. So for the brontosaurus, it is its long neck! But the body is the same as the other dinosaurs in the series. If you’re new to the CAL, visit the first dinosaur of the series, stegosaurus, for a photo tutorial of crocheting the body, tail and the legs! 

The body begins as a circle.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc).

Round 3: [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] six times (18 sc).

*Note that the last round is different from previous dinosaurs!*

Round 4: sc in next 17 sc, sl st in next sc, don’t fasten off.

Neck & head: ch 8, [yo, pull up a loop] twice in the 3rd ch from hook, pull through all loops on hook, ch 1 (popcorn stitch made), 2 sc in the same ch as popcorn stitch, 1 sc in each ch down the neck, continue on to back of the dinosaur…

Back: Fold body in half, skip the sc immediately next to the neck ch (on both sides), sl st in next sc and each sc through both layers of body across back, continue on to tail…

Tail: sl st in last st through both layers on back, ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sc in last 2 ch of tail, sl st in a space between the 3rd and 4th round in the body (belly part of the dinosaur). Remove hook and pull out the loop. Pull through enough yarn so that you have a 12″ tail. Cut yarn.

Hind leg: Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle, weave the needle through the belly of the dinosaur so that the needle comes out through a stitch between the 2nd and 3rd rounds of body in the front. Pull the yarn tail through, remove the needle. Insert hook through the stitch where the yarn tail came through. Pull up a loop using the yarn tail. 

ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, remove hook and pull the yarn tail out.

Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle again, insert needle in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body, then come out in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body in the front on the opposite side.

Front leg: Work as the same as hind leg, as follows: remove needle, insert hook through the stitch where the yarn tail came through, pull up a loop with the yarn tail. ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, pull out yarn tail, thread yarn tail back in tapestry needle, insert needle through a stitch between 2nd and 3rd round of body, then come out near the top on the back of the piece, fasten off.

Using contrasting colour yarn and tapestry needle, make French knots on body for spots.

Using black seed beads, sewing needle and thread, attach eyes. Weave in all ends.

Woohoo! That wasn’t too hard, right?

 

To recap, here are the mystery dino CAL posts so far:

Mystery dino CAL intro post

Stu the Stegosaurus

Dmitri the Dimetrodon

Trixie the Triceratops

 

Don’t forget to share your dinosaur pics by:

  • Emailing genuinemudpie[at]gmail[dot]com
  • Bloggers: leave a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagram: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Joining the Ravelry group
  • Posting your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

 

Stay peculiar, friends! :)

 

mystery dino CAL: triceratops!

This week’s feature dinosaur is everyone’s favourite vegetarian — Trixie Triceratops! Yes, she is named after the dinosaur toy down the street from Toy Story 3 :D

I made both versions of Trixie with a heavy worsted / bulky yarn and a 4 mm hook, because I’ve always had the idea that it’s a chunky kind of dinosaur. So the finished dinosaur is slightly larger than the other dinosaurs we have been making. The head of a triceratops is 1/3 of its total length! So I’ve also made the body a bit smaller.

Triceratops is named for the 3 horns on its head (literally means “3-horned face”), so it was important to get this feature right, and I spent quite some time figuring out a way to make the horns look like they are seamlessly attached to the head. I’m quite happy with the way it turned out and it’s actually not difficult to do :)

Materials:

  • A bit of heavy worsted or bulky weight yarn for body and head
  • A bit of sport weight yarn in white, for horns
  • 4 mm hook
  • 2.5 mm hook
  • Tapestry needle
  • Sewing needle, black thread, 4 mm round black bead (if you don’t have that, the regular black seed bead would look fine too)
  • Fabric glue (optional)

Pattern:

The body, tail and legs of triceratops is the same as stegosaurus, except that it has one less round on the body, and skips the head. Check out the stegosaurus pattern page for photo tutorial especially on how to make the legs! But I’ll write the entire pattern below so it’s easy.

The body begins as a circle, and with larger hook and main colour.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc).

Round 3: [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] six times (18 sc).

Fold piece in half, sl st across back of dinosaur through both layers until last sc, don’t fasten off.

Tail: sl st in last st through both layers on back, ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sc in last 2 ch of tail, sl st in a space between the 3rd and 4th round in the body (belly part of the dinosaur). Remove hook and pull out the loop. Pull through enough yarn so that you have a 12″ tail. Cut yarn.

Hind leg: Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle, weave the needle through the belly of the dinosaur so that the needle comes out through a stitch between the 2nd and 3rd rounds of body in the front. Pull the yarn tail through, remove the needle. Insert hook through the stitch where the yarn tail came through. Pull up a loop using the yarn tail. 

ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, remove hook and pull the yarn tail out.

Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle again, insert needle in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body, then come out in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body in the front on the opposite side.

Front leg: Work as the same as hind leg, as follows: remove needle, insert hook through the stitch where the yarn tail came through, pull up a loop with the yarn tail. ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, pull out yarn tail, thread yarn tail back in tapestry needle, insert needle through a stitch between 2nd and 3rd round of body, then come out near the top on the back of the piece, fasten off.

Head: 

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd ch from hook, don’t join in the round.

Round 2: 1 sc in every sc around (6 sc).

Round 3: [2 sc in next sc, 1 sc in next sc] three times (9 sc).

Round 4: hdc in next sc, *[dc, ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, dc] in next sc*, * to * will be known as the “V-stitch”. Repeat V-stitch in next 2 sc, hdc in next sc, sc in next 4 sc, sl st in next st, pull out a long yarn tail for sewing, cut yarn. 

Horns:

Using white yarn and smaller hook, and leaving a 3″ tail, ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next 3 ch, ch 8, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next 3 ch, ch 8, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next 2 ch, fasten off, leaving a 3″ tail.

You will end up with something that looks like this — 2 longer (forehead) horns separated by ch 3, and a shorter (nose) horn separated from one of the longer horns by ch 4.

Remember the V-stitch in the last round (round 4) of the head? Insert smaller hook (or an even smaller hook if you have one) into the base of the first V-stitch you made in round 4 (the V-stitch on the most right when you’re facing it), then insert tip of the hook through a loop at the top of the forehead horn on the right. Pull the horn through the stitch in head.

Then, insert hook into the base of the last V-stitch made in round 4 (the V-stitch on the most left when you’re facing it). Insert tip of the hook through a loop at the top of the remaining forehead horn, pull the horn through the stitch in head. 

Finally, insert hook into a space between two sc’s in round 1 of head, then insert tip of the hook through a loop at the top of the nose horn, pull the horn through the stitch in head.

Tie the yarn tails of the horns together. You can put some fabric glue at the stitches where the horns were pulled through inside the head to secure them more, but that’s optional.

Here’s a close up of the head so you can see how the horns are positioned…

Now we sew the head to the body. (When I took process pictures I forgot to put the horns on before sewing the head to the body, hence the head without horns in these pictures. That makes sewing on the horns more difficult — but not impossible — I would still suggest sewing on the horns first before attaching head to body)

Thread the tapestry needle through the yarn tail left on head. We’re attaching the base of the head to the nub on the neck end of the body.

You’re folding the head piece in half, and the head will sandwich the “neck” part of the body, like so. Stitch through all layers a few times, then fasten off.

Sew the eye right below the forehead horn. Weave in all the ends. And here she is, in Trixie colours! :D

 

To recap, here are the mystery dino CAL posts so far:

Mystery dino CAL intro post

Stu the Stegosaurus

Dmitri the Dimetrodon

Don’t forget to share your dinosaur pics by:

  • Emailing genuinemudpie[at]gmail[dot]com
  • Bloggers: leave a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagram: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Joining the Ravelry group
  • Posting your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

 

Have a beautiful week everyone! :D

 

mystery dino CAL: dimetrodon!

Welcome to the second episode of mystery dino crochet-along! Meet Mike’s favourite, Dmitri the Dimetrodon! Known for the awesome sail on its back! Its construction is very similar to Stu the stegosaurus, with the same dumpling base :D

The prototype for Dmitri was made while we were waiting for our flight home at Calgary airport. The bulky light blue yarn was all I had, but I think it turned out great! 

Fun facts about Dmitri: It is a Greek name that means earth-lover, and the name of my grade 12 math teacher, Ms. Dmitri :)

Fun facts about dimetrodon (from here and here):

  • It’s actually not a dinosaur, but a prehistoric reptile! (but we love you anyway, Dmitri!)
  • It used its sail to regulate body temperature
  • Its name refers to its 2 different types of teeth, rather than its famous sail (and it’s a meat-eater!)

I didn’t have beads with me so the poor thing was eyeless the entire flight home :S

For the light blue one with chunky yarn, I used a 4mm hook for the body, and 2.5mm hook and a light worsted yarn for the sail on its back. It’s slightly bigger than the regular size one. Hook and yarn for the regular size is below.

 

Material:

  • Small amount of worsted yarn — for body (green)
  • Small amount of light worsted or sport weight yarn — for sail (pink)
  • 3.5 mm hook — for body
  • 2.5 mm hook — for sail
  • Tapestry needle
  • Sewing needle, black thread, black seed bead

Pattern:

It’s the same as stegosaurus for the body, tail and legs, so if you’ve made Stu the stegosaurus, you’d have no problem making Dmitri! But I’ll repeat the entire pattern here anyway so it’s easy. You might still want to check out the link for Stu though, because it has some explanatory photos that might help clarify the steps.

The body begins as a circle, and with larger hook and green yarn.

Round 1: ch 2, 6 sc in 2nd sc from hook, don’t join in round.

Round 2: 2 sc in each sc around (12 sc).

Round 3: [sc in next sc, 2 sc in next sc] six times (18 sc).

Round 4: sc in each sc around (18 sc), don’t fasten off.

Next, we make the head: in the same sc where last sc was made, [yo, pull up a loop] three times, pull through all loops on hook, ch 1 (cluster made), sc in same sc as cluster. Don’t fasten off.

We now fold the piece in half, and from here on crochet through both layers across the back of the dinosaur.

Sail: sl st in next 2 sc, sl st in next sc and attach pink yarn when pulling up loop to finish the sl st.

Don’t fasten off green, carry it as you work across the back with pink.

The sail is worked in rows perpendicular to the back of the dinosaur.

Row 1: ch 3, sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next ch, sl st in next sc through both layers in body/back of dinosaur, turn.

Row 2: In front loops only (FLO), sc in next 2 sc, turn.

Row 3: ch 2, sc in 2nd ch from hook, in back loops only (BLO), sc in next 2 sc, sl st in next sc in body, turn.

Row 4: sc in next 3 sc FLO, turn.

Row 5: ch 1, sc in next 3 sc BLO, sl st in next sc in body, turn.

Row 6: sc in next 3 sc FLO, turn.

Row 7: Skip first sc, sc in next 2 sc BLO, sl st in next sc in body, turn.

Row 8: sc in next 2 sc FLO, turn.

Row 9: Skip first sc, sc in next sc BLO, sl st in body by pulling up a loop using the green yarn that you’ve been carrying, fasten off pink, continue with green for tail.

Tail: sl st in last st through both layers on back, ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, sl st in next ch, sc in last 2 ch of tail, sl st in a space between the 3rd and 4th round in the body (belly part of the dinosaur). Remove hook and pull out the loop, as shown in the picture. Pull through enough yarn so that you have a 12″ tail. Cut yarn.

(You might want to check out the pictures in the stegosaurus post for the legs — it’s really easier than it looks in writing.)

Hind leg:

Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle, weave the needle through the belly of the dinosaur so that the needle comes out through the 2nd and 3rd rounds of body in the front. Pull the yarn tail through, remove the needle. Insert smaller hook (if you have it) through the stitch where the yarn tail came through, then pull up a loop using the yarn tail. 

ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, remove hook and pull the yarn tail out.

Thread the yarn tail through the tapestry needle again, insert needle in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body, then come out in a stitch between 1st and 2nd round in body in the front on the opposite side.

Front leg:

Work as the same as hind leg, as follows: remove needle, insert hook through the stitch where the yarn tail came through, pull up a loop with the yarn tail. ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, pull out yarn tail, thread yarn tail back in tapestry needle, insert needle through a stitch between 2nd and 3rd round of body, then come out near the top on the back of the piece, fasten off.

Weave in all the ends. Pull the long yarn tail into the body of the dinosaur to fill it out a bit :)

Using sewing needle and black thread, sew on the seed bead as eye. Weave in thread end.

And it’s done! :D

Hope you enjoy making the dinosaurs! Don’t forget to share your creations by:

 

  • Emailing genuinemudpie[at]gmail[dot]com
  • Bloggers: leave a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  • Instagram: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  • Join the Ravelry group
  • Post your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages!

If you’re just joining now, here’s the recap of what we got so far!

 

As the saying goes… May the road rise up to meet you, and may the wind always fill your sail :) Have a terrific week! 

 

 

mystery dino CAL!

Introducing — mystery dino crochet-along! :D

This idea has been brewing in my head for a while, to make a series of tiny dinosaurs, thinking about different dinosaur shapes and ways to articulate them with crochet stitches… and I’ve been trying to figure out the best way to organize it and invite everyone to join in on the fun. But at the same time finding myself procrastinating with the designing… So I figure, I’d just launch it! That would make sure that I do it!

So here it is! Over the next little while you’ll find a dinosaur pattern posted every week, or, “excavated” from a square of the badlands above (ha!). Follow along to see what dinosaurs get unearthed! :D 

As you can see one dinosaur is already out! You can find the tiny stegosaurus here

What to do with tiny dinosaurs, you ask? It makes a wonderful zipper pull, brooch/pin, and travel companion…

They would also make really friendly fridge magnets. Or a baby mobile with all of them together. Or a pocket pal. They’re flat so it’s super easy to mail one to someone to brighten their day! Nothing says “never in a million years did I think I’d find someone so utterly perfect…” better than sending a dinosaur! (haha, maybe not, but still! Who doesn’t love a tiny dino?) 

So I invite you to journey along, and send me your dinosaur pics, and at the end I’ll put my amateur graphic design skills to good use and make a virtual dino party with all of your pictures! It will be a riot! :D

You can share your pictures by:

  1. Emailing genuinemudpie[at]gmail[dot]com
  2. Bloggers: leave a comment on any of the Mystery Dino CAL posts with a link to your blog post with the picture.
  3. Instagram: tag me @genuinemudpie and use the hashtag #mysterydinocal
  4. Join the Ravelry group
  5. Post your FOs to my Ravelry dino project pages

 

I hope you will join me! Have a rawrrring weekend everyone! :D 

 

this week’s awesome finds

Weather in Toronto finally feels a bit more like fall and more conducive to cozy yarn-crafting :)

 

I’m a big fan of Two of Wand’s simple but always interesting designs. I especially love the contrasting textures in this wrap. You can find the pattern here

 

Another design I really like is this cowl. It’s a simple modification of a regular cowl, but so much more cool-looking and sculptural. You can find the paid pattern here.

 

Cozy and bright. Paid pattern by Crochet Bit on Ravelry.

 

A yarrrrrn mouse! :D Pattern by Whodunnknit.

 

This is frankly hilarious, and reminds me of Sherman of Sherman’s Lagoon, and Liz Climo’s shark friend :D Pattern on Knitty!

 

 

Who doesn’t love an acorn with surprises inside? :D From Oh Happy Day.

 

For all the Miffy fans! A free (!!) knitting pattern by Knitter Bees. Can make different interchangeable sweaters!

 

But my skill level is probably a better match for this fox. This very cute square fox. By The Bushcrafter.

 

This, and many other inspiring ideas using toy dinosaurs, on Brisbane Kids. (Seriously thinking about making this, wonder how I could get the toy dinos on the wood though… epoxy, maybe? Or glue with a screw on the back? Hmm…)

 

Happy autumn! :D

 

 

 

what’s so bad about the badlands?

It’s so hard to leave!! :’(

The badlands has become one of my favourite places on earth (granted that I haven’t been to many places on earth, but still). Drumheller, particularly, has the friendliest people (and creatures, as you’ll see) and the most beautiful landscapes.

But let’s backtrack a bit, because I don’t want to leave out Calgary! We were only going to pick up a rental car, but thought since we’re half way across the country, we should at least walk around a bit. We saw a few of the many pieces of wonderful public art installations in the city, and really appreciated the free stretch of CTrain that brought us from one end of downtown to the other. Imagine if we have this in Toronto! It would be one less barrier for people to get to helpful resources and appointments.

When we approached Drumheller on the highway (it was maybe a few kilometers away), it looked like this, which pretty much looked the same the whole way we drove through the Prairies from Calgary. 

We left Calgary a bit later than planned, so it was just about dinner time, and I was looking forward to settling in with some fries and burger. Or maybe pasta. Or even just soup.

It says it has 8000 people,” I said to Mike.

Yes,” said Mike, eyes on the road.

It says it has an A&W,” I looked at him, starting to panic. “Where ARE all the people?” and the food? Are we lost?! 

The sign says Drumheller,” said Mike.

 And then there it was.

Driving into the valley, for someone who has never been to the valley, was quite a mind-blowing experience. It wasn’t just driving into the valley, it was like dropping into a completely different planet.

The landscape was at once alien and mesmerizing, formed by millions of years of rich history. There’s so much to explore!

1) The Hoodoos!

A variation of the word “voodoo”, so named because of their ghostly appearance and they were thought to possess supernatural powers. We first visited the Hoodoo Trail on a rainy day, so we mostly stayed on constructed paths and platforms, because the bentonite clay, which covers much of the badlands, was very slippery to walk on when wet. (more on that later!)

Hoodoos are formations of sandstone with a capstone on top that protects the pillar underneath from erosion. They’re quite phenomenal. Someone described them as mushrooms that appear over thousands of years in the badlands, which makes them all the more special to me :)

We couldn’t help but returned for a second visit at sunrise, just before we left Drumheller.

Because it wasn’t raining, we were able to get closer to these majestic, sculptural forms.

 

2) The East Coulee School Museum!

The valley was a tropical area millions of years ago rich with plant life and dinosaurs, which means that it then also has a high concentration of coal, from the fossils. Many towns in the region were built during the coal rush, East Coulee was one of these towns. According to the very friendly museum staff, at its height the town has a population of over 3000, but after demands for coal diminished in the 70s, population decreased to 160 currently, and the school, where the miners’ children attended, became a museum and provincial historic site.

 

The museum is a treasure trove of artifacts and stories. Many of the original structures and furnishing were kept (like child-size washroom stalls and drinking fountains, separate entrances for boys and girls, playground equipment and these compact desks!), and there are many pictures I could show you, but I’d leave it for you to explore yourself if you visit! :D Do chat with the museum staff about a tour of the basement and encounters of the supernatural kind if you’re a brave soul :S But if you’re like me, you’d probably prefer stories of the historical kind, found at one end of the hallway in a collection of photographs and quotes from miners about life and work in the valley, and in the diaries on each student’s desk (about what they had for lunch on a day in 1938). And don’t forget to visit the tea room for a pot of tea and treats!

3) Atlas Coal Mine

Not far from the school museum is the Atlas Coal Mine, the last to close in 1979, and now also a museum! The tipple is the last structure of its kind in Canada. I found it both awe-inspiring and a bit menacing, and really felt that my life is quite comfortable compared to the way it was.

We spent quite a bit of time exploring the grounds because we had a lot of time before our scheduled train tour and because there was a lot to see and take interesting pictures of. Abandoned trains and cars and weathered buildings against the backdrop of the badlands were an aspiring photographer’s dream. And we were lucky enough to run into Raindrop, or Lady Wildfire, Atlas’ super affectionate resident cat!

We were watching a video in one of the exhibit rooms, other visitors started walking by and smiling at us, thinking that we brought our cat on the trip, and now settling in, in front of the TV, with the cat in our laps. “How cute,” one woman said. “It’s not our cat,” I said. “Oh! Can I pet it?” the woman exclaimed. Then Raindrop ran away :(

We did see Raindrop a few more times when we were on the train tour, I think she was roaming the grounds :) The friendly museum staff shared some interesting stories of life in the coal mine, and we even got to meet a man who worked at the Atlas mine since he was 14, and he told a few stories as well! We were very lucky indeed :D

4) The Last Chance Saloon

It is the only business left in the coal town, Wayne. A fun place to stop for lunch after touring the museums. Lots to see while waiting for food!

5) Royal Tyrrell Museum

I’ve been looking forward to visiting this museum of paleontology since forever! I’ve never seen specimens so amazing. 

There has actually been a lot of press about this nodosaur. It is so well preserved, you can see the texture of its skin. To see it with my own eyes rather than a picture on the screen is a remarkable experience.

We took a hiking tour led by a museum staff in the Midland Provincial Park, which is right next to the museum.

Here I took some close up pictures of the plants in the badlands. The flower of this plant is just a couple of millimeters across.

And this is a super macro picture of bentonite clay! Which is formed from volcanic ash, and would puff up and become more slippery than soap when wet, making the badlands difficult to travel through on rainy days.

6) Hiking in the canyons!

I consulted with this website before going to the Horseshoe Canyon for a sunrise hike (for good pictures) and was expecting easy paths, but was sad to see that the wooden paths and staircases have all been torn down, without any signage explaining what was going on. So we ventured down (a steep hill! coming back up was quite a workout) and carefully walked around in a small area, it was worth the climb!

We then drove back on South Dinosaur Trail and stopped at Orkney Lookout to view the Red Deer River, which was highly recommended by the friendly school museum staff. It was magnificent indeed!

We then crossed back to the North Dinosaur Trail by taking the Bleriot Ferry, which was kind of like a section of a road that shifts from one shore of the Red Deer River to another. It was free, and the ferry staff was also very friendly. He told us a story about a Jeep that attempted to jump onto the ferry after it had departed from shore, like in the movies. It fell into the river. No one was hurt though, I think. “Never a dull moment out here,” he said :D

We then stopped at Horsethief Canyon, so named because 1) according to the Tyrrell Museum staff, people who stole horses would hide in this canyon and then accidentally fell into sink holes (to warn us about the danger of hidden sink holes when walking in the badlands) or 2) according to the plaque at the canyon, horses would wander into the canyon, disappear for a while, and come out carrying different branding. Either way, it was breathtakingly beautiful from the lookout point.

We found a way to hike down, and even found some inukshuks! Mike made his own to add to the group :)

And we kept running into this ground squirrel, who tapped Mike’s hand with his paws! Mike insisted that he was hugged by the squirrel. And I thought, I really liked hiking in the badlands, there’re no bears, or coyotes, just friendly ground squirrels :) (I think maybe there are rattle snakes, but we didn’t see any :S) 

7) Dinos, dinos, dinos

From the World’s Biggest Dinosaur to the dozens of fun dinosaur sculptures in town :D

This is my favourite shot of the World’s Biggest Dinosaur, across from the Red Deer River, all menacing, like it’s in its own natural habitat :D

And this is my favourite of all the pictures we took with the friendly dinosaur sculptures, Mike spent quite a bit of time getting the lighting perfect :)

We were very sad to leave, as you may guess :’( Difficult as it was, we drove out of the valley for the last time, hoping that we will return one day.

And on our way back to Calgary for the flight home, we took a very short side trip to the Village of Beiseker, to visit the world’s largest skunk! Its name is Squirt. It was on a campground, and at its foot a Saturday morning game of horseshoes was going on, and a very friendly woman took this picture of us :D

Thus concludes our wild west adventures! Thank you for virtually journeying with us, I hope you enjoy the pictures, and if you haven’t visited these wonderful places, especially the Canadian Badlands, I hope you will one day! :D